Predicting Children's Unintentional Injuries: The Role of Maternal Supervision and Child's Routines of Daily Living

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163201
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Predicting Children's Unintentional Injuries: The Role of Maternal Supervision and Child's Routines of Daily Living
Author(s):
Koulouglioti, Christina; Kitzman, Harriet; Cole, Robert; Yoos, Lorrie; Liptak, Gregory
Author Details:
Christina Koulouglioti, Ph.D, RN, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Christina_Koulouglioti@urmc.rochester.edu; Harriet Kitzman, Ph.D, RN; Robert Cole, Ph.D; Lorrie Yoos, Ph.D, RN; Gregory Liptak, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: To examine the role of maternal supervision and child's routines of daily living in the prediction of unintentional injuries, including maternal fatigue, maternal depression, and child's sleep as key factors. Theoretical Framework: A conceptual model based on the Bioecological Model by Bronfenbrenner and the Family Routines concept. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive correlational study of 278 sociodemographically diverse mothers and their 3 year-old children. Participants were recruited from 4 pediatric practices in Rochester NY. Maternal supervision was measured as the number of minutes mothers would leave their children unsupervised in various environmental situations. Child's routines of daily living were measured from the Child Routines Inventory (CRI). Child's medically attended injuries were obtained via maternal report and medical record abstraction. Correlational analysis and Poisson regression analysis was conducted. Results: It was found that supervision was influenced by maternal fatigue, and maternal depression. Mothers with high levels of fatigue and depression reported leaving their children unsupervised for longer periods of time. Children of mothers who reported high levels of fatigue and children with less frequent routines of daily living acquired less sleep and those children who did not get enough sleep sustained more injuries (b = 0.180, p< 0.01). There were significant interactions between supervision and routines (b of the interaction = -0.005, p< 0.05). Lack of supervision was related to injuries only for children with less frequent routines of daily living. Supervision, it seems is most important for children at elevated risk for injury - risk resulting from other aspects of family life such as the presence of unpredictable routines. Conclusions and Implications: The present results highlight the complexity inherent in the problem of childhood injury and provide evidence that routines and supervision play an important role in the prediction of injuries. The identification of modifiable key factors presents new possibilities for the development of practical and effective injury prevention interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePredicting Children's Unintentional Injuries: The Role of Maternal Supervision and Child's Routines of Daily Livingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKoulouglioti, Christinaen_US
dc.contributor.authorKitzman, Harrieten_US
dc.contributor.authorCole, Roberten_US
dc.contributor.authorYoos, Lorrieen_US
dc.contributor.authorLiptak, Gregoryen_US
dc.author.detailsChristina Koulouglioti, Ph.D, RN, Postdoctoral Fellow, University of Rochester, School of Nursing, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Christina_Koulouglioti@urmc.rochester.edu; Harriet Kitzman, Ph.D, RN; Robert Cole, Ph.D; Lorrie Yoos, Ph.D, RN; Gregory Liptak, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163201-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To examine the role of maternal supervision and child's routines of daily living in the prediction of unintentional injuries, including maternal fatigue, maternal depression, and child's sleep as key factors. Theoretical Framework: A conceptual model based on the Bioecological Model by Bronfenbrenner and the Family Routines concept. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive correlational study of 278 sociodemographically diverse mothers and their 3 year-old children. Participants were recruited from 4 pediatric practices in Rochester NY. Maternal supervision was measured as the number of minutes mothers would leave their children unsupervised in various environmental situations. Child's routines of daily living were measured from the Child Routines Inventory (CRI). Child's medically attended injuries were obtained via maternal report and medical record abstraction. Correlational analysis and Poisson regression analysis was conducted. Results: It was found that supervision was influenced by maternal fatigue, and maternal depression. Mothers with high levels of fatigue and depression reported leaving their children unsupervised for longer periods of time. Children of mothers who reported high levels of fatigue and children with less frequent routines of daily living acquired less sleep and those children who did not get enough sleep sustained more injuries (b = 0.180, p< 0.01). There were significant interactions between supervision and routines (b of the interaction = -0.005, p< 0.05). Lack of supervision was related to injuries only for children with less frequent routines of daily living. Supervision, it seems is most important for children at elevated risk for injury - risk resulting from other aspects of family life such as the presence of unpredictable routines. Conclusions and Implications: The present results highlight the complexity inherent in the problem of childhood injury and provide evidence that routines and supervision play an important role in the prediction of injuries. The identification of modifiable key factors presents new possibilities for the development of practical and effective injury prevention interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:13Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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