2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163202
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Hand Hygiene Adherence among Healthcare Providers
Author(s):
Kreamer, Carolyn; Harne-Britner, Sarah; Allen, Marianne; Clement, Mary Ann; Fowler, Kimberly
Author Details:
Carolyn Kreamer, Messiah College, Nursing School, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kreamer@messiah.edu; Sarah Harne-Britner; Marianne Allen; Mary Ann Clement; Kimberly Fowler
Abstract:
Purpose: Hand hygiene is the most effective way to prevent nosocomial infections, yet adherence rates range from 20% to 80%. Educational and behavioral interventions have been studied, but none have resulted in sustained improvements in adherence rates. The purposes of this study were to determine 1) the effectiveness of educational and behavioral interventions on improving hand hygiene adherence, 2) post-intervention sustained adherence and 3) the relationships between adherence and nosocomial infection rates pre/post-interventions. Theoretical Framework: Behavioral and change theories provided the study's framework. Using Bandura's concepts of organizational pre-change, change and post-change and Lewin's theories of unfreezing and refreezing changes, three phases of data collection and behavioral strategies were implemented: assessing personal and environmental factors that motivate change, enforcing environmental factors and role modeling that support change, and providing positive reinforcement after behavior changed. Interventions selected to motivate change were based upon Skinner's work in operant conditioning. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This quasi-experimental study was conducted on three medical-surgical units at two acute care hospitals. Baseline data on infections rates for the study units were collected for three months prior to the interventions. Baseline observations of adherence were collected by trained data collectors using a tool developed by the Infection Control Department. The experimental and control units' staff were given one month to complete a hand hygiene educational module. Experimental unit #1 received a behavioral intervention that included individual and group rewards for improved adherence. Experimental unit #2 received behavioral interventions that focused on the risks of non-adherence including specific organisms cultured on that unit. Adherence observations are being recorded monthly for six months. Chi-square analyses will be used to compare adherence and infection rates. Results: Preliminary data suggest that individual and group rewards results in initial and sustained improvement in adherence. Conclusions and Implications: This multi-dimensional approach can be used as a model to improve and sustain hand hygiene adherence.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Hand Hygiene Adherence among Healthcare Providersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorKreamer, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarne-Britner, Sarahen_US
dc.contributor.authorAllen, Marianneen_US
dc.contributor.authorClement, Mary Annen_US
dc.contributor.authorFowler, Kimberlyen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Kreamer, Messiah College, Nursing School, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kreamer@messiah.edu; Sarah Harne-Britner; Marianne Allen; Mary Ann Clement; Kimberly Fowleren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163202-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Hand hygiene is the most effective way to prevent nosocomial infections, yet adherence rates range from 20% to 80%. Educational and behavioral interventions have been studied, but none have resulted in sustained improvements in adherence rates. The purposes of this study were to determine 1) the effectiveness of educational and behavioral interventions on improving hand hygiene adherence, 2) post-intervention sustained adherence and 3) the relationships between adherence and nosocomial infection rates pre/post-interventions. Theoretical Framework: Behavioral and change theories provided the study's framework. Using Bandura's concepts of organizational pre-change, change and post-change and Lewin's theories of unfreezing and refreezing changes, three phases of data collection and behavioral strategies were implemented: assessing personal and environmental factors that motivate change, enforcing environmental factors and role modeling that support change, and providing positive reinforcement after behavior changed. Interventions selected to motivate change were based upon Skinner's work in operant conditioning. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This quasi-experimental study was conducted on three medical-surgical units at two acute care hospitals. Baseline data on infections rates for the study units were collected for three months prior to the interventions. Baseline observations of adherence were collected by trained data collectors using a tool developed by the Infection Control Department. The experimental and control units' staff were given one month to complete a hand hygiene educational module. Experimental unit #1 received a behavioral intervention that included individual and group rewards for improved adherence. Experimental unit #2 received behavioral interventions that focused on the risks of non-adherence including specific organisms cultured on that unit. Adherence observations are being recorded monthly for six months. Chi-square analyses will be used to compare adherence and infection rates. Results: Preliminary data suggest that individual and group rewards results in initial and sustained improvement in adherence. Conclusions and Implications: This multi-dimensional approach can be used as a model to improve and sustain hand hygiene adherence.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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