2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163203
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Improving Medication Calculation Skills of Nurses and Nursing Students:
Author(s):
Kreamer, Carolyn; Harne-Britner, Sarah
Author Details:
Carolyn Kreamer, Messiah College, Nursing School, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kreamer@messiah.edu; Sarah Harne-Britner
Abstract:
Purpose: Research on the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses show that the majority are unable to calculate medications at a 90% level of proficiency. The purposes of this study were to 1) assess the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior baccalaureate students and 2) test the effectiveness of teaching strategies to improve computational skills. Theoretical Framework: Knowles theory of andragogy provided the theoretical foundation for the teaching strategies used in this study. Components of the theory such as self-direction, relevance of learning, and choice were incorporated into the educational interventions. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A pre-test/post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 21 nurses from an urban hospital and 32 senior baccalaureate nursing students participated in the study. After viewing a presentation on the importance of accurate medication calculation, participants completed a demographic questionnaire and Medication Calculation Pre-test. Participants then chose among three educational strategies to improve calculation skills: classroom tutorial session, self-study workbook, or self-study using own references. Participants completed a Medication Calculation Post-test four weeks later. The Medication Calculation Pre and Post-tests were researcher-developed instruments reviewed by experts for face and content validity. The Kuder-Richardson (KR20) for both tests was 0.764. Results: An across groups comparative analysis of students' and nurses' pre- and post-test scores showed no significant differences (pre-test t = -5.457; p = 0.646; post-test t = -1.868, p = 0.068). Both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in tests scores (students t = -3.218, p = 0.003; nurses t = -5.457; p = 0.001) when within group pre-and post-test scores were compared. All intervention groups showed improvement although there were no statistically significant differences between intervention groups (f = 1.355, p = .268). Conclusions and Implications: The small, non-random sample limits the generalizability of the findings, but data trends suggest that teaching strategies based on adult learning principles can improve medication calculation skills.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleImproving Medication Calculation Skills of Nurses and Nursing Students:en_GB
dc.contributor.authorKreamer, Carolynen_US
dc.contributor.authorHarne-Britner, Sarahen_US
dc.author.detailsCarolyn Kreamer, Messiah College, Nursing School, Grantham, Pennsylvania, USA, email: kreamer@messiah.edu; Sarah Harne-Britneren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163203-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Research on the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses show that the majority are unable to calculate medications at a 90% level of proficiency. The purposes of this study were to 1) assess the medication calculation skills of practicing nurses and senior baccalaureate students and 2) test the effectiveness of teaching strategies to improve computational skills. Theoretical Framework: Knowles theory of andragogy provided the theoretical foundation for the teaching strategies used in this study. Components of the theory such as self-direction, relevance of learning, and choice were incorporated into the educational interventions. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A pre-test/post-test design was used. A convenience sample of 21 nurses from an urban hospital and 32 senior baccalaureate nursing students participated in the study. After viewing a presentation on the importance of accurate medication calculation, participants completed a demographic questionnaire and Medication Calculation Pre-test. Participants then chose among three educational strategies to improve calculation skills: classroom tutorial session, self-study workbook, or self-study using own references. Participants completed a Medication Calculation Post-test four weeks later. The Medication Calculation Pre and Post-tests were researcher-developed instruments reviewed by experts for face and content validity. The Kuder-Richardson (KR20) for both tests was 0.764. Results: An across groups comparative analysis of students' and nurses' pre- and post-test scores showed no significant differences (pre-test t = -5.457; p = 0.646; post-test t = -1.868, p = 0.068). Both groups demonstrated a significant improvement in tests scores (students t = -3.218, p = 0.003; nurses t = -5.457; p = 0.001) when within group pre-and post-test scores were compared. All intervention groups showed improvement although there were no statistically significant differences between intervention groups (f = 1.355, p = .268). Conclusions and Implications: The small, non-random sample limits the generalizability of the findings, but data trends suggest that teaching strategies based on adult learning principles can improve medication calculation skills.</td></tr></table>en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.