Advancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration (ARCC): A Pilot Test of an Intervention to Improve Evidence-Based Care and Patient Outcomes in a Community Health Care Setting

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163210
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Advancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration (ARCC): A Pilot Test of an Intervention to Improve Evidence-Based Care and Patient Outcomes in a Community Health Care Setting
Author(s):
Levin, Rona F.; Vetter, MaryJo; Scharf, Paula; Melnyk, Bernadette M.; Fineout-Overholt, Ellen
Author Details:
Rona F. Levin, PhD, RN, Professor/Visiting Faculty, Pace University, Nursing/Clinical Education, Pleasantville, New York, USA, email: rlevin@pace.edu; MaryJo Vetter, MS, RN, NP.C; Paula Scharf, PhD, RN; Bernadette M. Melnyk, Phd, RN, FAAN; Ellen Fineout-Overholt, PhD, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The primary aim of this 2-phase pilot study is to evaluate effects of an evidence-based practice (EBP) education and mentoring program (ARCC) on selected outcomes. Secondary aims are to assess feasibility of design, determine relationships among variables, and establish beginning reliability and validity for two new tools, EBP Beliefs and EBP Implementation Scales. Theoretical Framework: Control Theory (Carver, 1979; Carver & Scheier, 1983) is the basis for ARCC interventions in this study. This theory postulates that a discrepancy between a standard or goal (e.g., EBP) and a current state (e.g., current nursing practice) precipitates behaviors that will assist the individual in reaching the standard or goal. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): In phase one a two-group experimental design enlisted nursing teams in the Long Term Home Health Care Program (LTHHCP) of the VNSNY, which were randomly assigned to an ARCC or comparison group. The ARCC intervention consists of 4 one-hour presentations on EBP basics and an on-site EBP mentor for a 12-week consultation period to help nurses design an EBP project. Phase 2, implementation of the EBP project, is in progress. The comparison group received education on adult physical assessment comparable in length to the "EBP basics". Outcome variables for nurses are: beliefs about EBP, EBP implementation behavior, job satisfaction, group cohesion, collaboration, and productivity. System outcomes include adverse events (e.g., emergent care) and patient satisfaction, which are being collected from the VNSNY databases. Results: Preliminary data analysis of phase I nurse data using t-tests revealed positive statistically significant changes in the ARCC group in their EBP beliefs, EBP implementation behaviors and perceptions of group cohesion. All instruments demonstrated good to excellent alphas. Additional findings for phase 1 of the study will be available for presentation. Conclusions and Implications: Findings provide support for the effectiveness of the ARCC model and demonstrate initial construct validity for the EBP Beliefs and Implementation scales.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAdvancing Research and Clinical Practice Through Close Collaboration (ARCC): A Pilot Test of an Intervention to Improve Evidence-Based Care and Patient Outcomes in a Community Health Care Settingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLevin, Rona F.en_US
dc.contributor.authorVetter, MaryJoen_US
dc.contributor.authorScharf, Paulaen_US
dc.contributor.authorMelnyk, Bernadette M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFineout-Overholt, Ellenen_US
dc.author.detailsRona F. Levin, PhD, RN, Professor/Visiting Faculty, Pace University, Nursing/Clinical Education, Pleasantville, New York, USA, email: rlevin@pace.edu; MaryJo Vetter, MS, RN, NP.C; Paula Scharf, PhD, RN; Bernadette M. Melnyk, Phd, RN, FAAN; Ellen Fineout-Overholt, PhD, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163210-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The primary aim of this 2-phase pilot study is to evaluate effects of an evidence-based practice (EBP) education and mentoring program (ARCC) on selected outcomes. Secondary aims are to assess feasibility of design, determine relationships among variables, and establish beginning reliability and validity for two new tools, EBP Beliefs and EBP Implementation Scales. Theoretical Framework: Control Theory (Carver, 1979; Carver & Scheier, 1983) is the basis for ARCC interventions in this study. This theory postulates that a discrepancy between a standard or goal (e.g., EBP) and a current state (e.g., current nursing practice) precipitates behaviors that will assist the individual in reaching the standard or goal. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): In phase one a two-group experimental design enlisted nursing teams in the Long Term Home Health Care Program (LTHHCP) of the VNSNY, which were randomly assigned to an ARCC or comparison group. The ARCC intervention consists of 4 one-hour presentations on EBP basics and an on-site EBP mentor for a 12-week consultation period to help nurses design an EBP project. Phase 2, implementation of the EBP project, is in progress. The comparison group received education on adult physical assessment comparable in length to the "EBP basics". Outcome variables for nurses are: beliefs about EBP, EBP implementation behavior, job satisfaction, group cohesion, collaboration, and productivity. System outcomes include adverse events (e.g., emergent care) and patient satisfaction, which are being collected from the VNSNY databases. Results: Preliminary data analysis of phase I nurse data using t-tests revealed positive statistically significant changes in the ARCC group in their EBP beliefs, EBP implementation behaviors and perceptions of group cohesion. All instruments demonstrated good to excellent alphas. Additional findings for phase 1 of the study will be available for presentation. Conclusions and Implications: Findings provide support for the effectiveness of the ARCC model and demonstrate initial construct validity for the EBP Beliefs and Implementation scales.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:22Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:22Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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