2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163211
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Older Male Prisoners' Health: Status, Beliefs, and Behaviors
Author(s):
Loeb, Susan J.; Steffensmeier, Darrell
Author Details:
Susan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Penn State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Darrell Steffensmeier, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relations among the health: status; beliefs, and behaviors of older men in prison. Theoretical Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 2004) was the guiding framework. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 51 male inmates (age 50 or older) incarcerated at a Pennsylvania Department of Corrections facility participated in this pilot study. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to conduct the face-to-face survey study. The machine readable questionnaire administered included: items from the Older Men's Health Program and Screening Inventory (Loeb, 2003) and the Health Promotion Activities of Older Adults Measure (Padula, 1997); demographic items; and newly developed questions to measure self-efficacy and prisoner specific information. Analysis included: frequency distributions and descriptive statistics; Pearson product-moment correlations; and step-wise multiple regression. Results: Inmates with greater self-efficacy for health management: participated more frequently in health-promoting behaviors (r=.376; p< .001); rated their health to be better (r=.432; p< .001); and were more likely to report improvements in health since incarceration (r=.407; p< .01). In addition, anticipated benefits of health behaviors was positively related to: participation in health-promoting behaviors (r=.247; p< .05); self-rated health (r=277; p< .05); and improvements in health since incarceration (r=.420; p< .01). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the most predictive equation for health promoting behaviors; only self-efficacy for health management was in the final most predictive equation, and explained 19.8% of the variance. Conclusions and Implications: Findings point to the need for future research: using random sampling; including inmates at different security level facilities; and utilizing expanded methods for assessing self-efficacy for health management, since the single-item measure inquiring about respondents' confidence in their ability to manage health was found to be such an important correlate and predictor in this pilot study. In addition, developing educational interventions aimed at enhancing older male inmates' health knowledge and self-efficacy for health management are suggested.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOlder Male Prisoners' Health: Status, Beliefs, and Behaviorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorLoeb, Susan J.en_US
dc.contributor.authorSteffensmeier, Darrellen_US
dc.author.detailsSusan J. Loeb, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor of Nursing, Penn State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: SVL100@PSU.EDU; Darrell Steffensmeier, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163211-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study was to explore the relations among the health: status; beliefs, and behaviors of older men in prison. Theoretical Framework: Social Cognitive Theory (Bandura, 2004) was the guiding framework. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 51 male inmates (age 50 or older) incarcerated at a Pennsylvania Department of Corrections facility participated in this pilot study. Institutional Review Board approval was obtained to conduct the face-to-face survey study. The machine readable questionnaire administered included: items from the Older Men's Health Program and Screening Inventory (Loeb, 2003) and the Health Promotion Activities of Older Adults Measure (Padula, 1997); demographic items; and newly developed questions to measure self-efficacy and prisoner specific information. Analysis included: frequency distributions and descriptive statistics; Pearson product-moment correlations; and step-wise multiple regression. Results: Inmates with greater self-efficacy for health management: participated more frequently in health-promoting behaviors (r=.376; p< .001); rated their health to be better (r=.432; p< .001); and were more likely to report improvements in health since incarceration (r=.407; p< .01). In addition, anticipated benefits of health behaviors was positively related to: participation in health-promoting behaviors (r=.247; p< .05); self-rated health (r=277; p< .05); and improvements in health since incarceration (r=.420; p< .01). A stepwise multiple regression analysis was conducted to determine the most predictive equation for health promoting behaviors; only self-efficacy for health management was in the final most predictive equation, and explained 19.8% of the variance. Conclusions and Implications: Findings point to the need for future research: using random sampling; including inmates at different security level facilities; and utilizing expanded methods for assessing self-efficacy for health management, since the single-item measure inquiring about respondents' confidence in their ability to manage health was found to be such an important correlate and predictor in this pilot study. In addition, developing educational interventions aimed at enhancing older male inmates' health knowledge and self-efficacy for health management are suggested.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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