Reducing the challenging behaviors associated with dementia: The effect of a skill-building nursing intervention on caregiver interactive behaviors

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163212
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Reducing the challenging behaviors associated with dementia: The effect of a skill-building nursing intervention on caregiver interactive behaviors
Author(s):
Mahler, Anne; Mahoney, Ellen K.
Author Details:
Anne Mahler, RN, BS, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: mahlera@bc.edu; Ellen K. Mahoney, RN, DNSc, FGSA
Abstract:
Purpose: Caregivers provide care for family members with dementia and are frequently confronted with challenging behaviors such as agitation and resistiveness to care. While specific caregiver behaviors have been identified that promote calm, functional behaviors in persons with dementia, few studies have focused on caregiver skill-building to improve interactive behaviors. This study identifies the effect a skill-building nursing intervention has on the interactive behavior of caregivers during bathing. Theoretical Framework: Need-driven dementia-compromised behavior (NDB) is defined as challenging behavior that signifies a need that the person with dementia can't effectively express. According to the NDB Model, situational variables that influence NDB's, including caregiver interactive behaviors, might be modified through a skill-building intervention, creating the potential to decrease the severity and frequency of NDB's. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This repeated measures, within subject design was performed as part of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Data were collected from 40 caregiver (age 67.2+/-14.2; male 27%; spouse 64%)- care receiver (age 77.0+/-8.3; MMSE 9.0+/-8.0) dyads, using the Interaction Behavior Measure (alpha= .75-.85). Trained blinded observers used this modified 7-item scale at baseline, post-intervention, and 8-week follow-up. The intervention included information, coaching and role-modeling to make interactions more person-centered and to improve communication between dyads during bathing. Results: Caregiver interactive behaviors improved significantly in response to skill-building intervention (F=12.9, p< .001) and this improvement was maintained at follow up. Items that demonstrated the most significant improvement were the personal, socially flexible, and relaxed behaviors. Conclusions and Implications: Caregiver interactive behaviors can be improved with a skill-building nursing intervention, as posited by the NDB Model. The next step is to investigate the effect of improved caregiver skill on behavior in persons with dementia. Families living with dementia will benefit from nursing interventions that can improve outcomes associated with providing care at home.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleReducing the challenging behaviors associated with dementia: The effect of a skill-building nursing intervention on caregiver interactive behaviorsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMahler, Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorMahoney, Ellen K.en_US
dc.author.detailsAnne Mahler, RN, BS, Boston College William F. Connell School of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: mahlera@bc.edu; Ellen K. Mahoney, RN, DNSc, FGSAen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163212-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Caregivers provide care for family members with dementia and are frequently confronted with challenging behaviors such as agitation and resistiveness to care. While specific caregiver behaviors have been identified that promote calm, functional behaviors in persons with dementia, few studies have focused on caregiver skill-building to improve interactive behaviors. This study identifies the effect a skill-building nursing intervention has on the interactive behavior of caregivers during bathing. Theoretical Framework: Need-driven dementia-compromised behavior (NDB) is defined as challenging behavior that signifies a need that the person with dementia can't effectively express. According to the NDB Model, situational variables that influence NDB's, including caregiver interactive behaviors, might be modified through a skill-building intervention, creating the potential to decrease the severity and frequency of NDB's. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This repeated measures, within subject design was performed as part of a randomized controlled clinical trial. Data were collected from 40 caregiver (age 67.2+/-14.2; male 27%; spouse 64%)- care receiver (age 77.0+/-8.3; MMSE 9.0+/-8.0) dyads, using the Interaction Behavior Measure (alpha= .75-.85). Trained blinded observers used this modified 7-item scale at baseline, post-intervention, and 8-week follow-up. The intervention included information, coaching and role-modeling to make interactions more person-centered and to improve communication between dyads during bathing. Results: Caregiver interactive behaviors improved significantly in response to skill-building intervention (F=12.9, p< .001) and this improvement was maintained at follow up. Items that demonstrated the most significant improvement were the personal, socially flexible, and relaxed behaviors. Conclusions and Implications: Caregiver interactive behaviors can be improved with a skill-building nursing intervention, as posited by the NDB Model. The next step is to investigate the effect of improved caregiver skill on behavior in persons with dementia. Families living with dementia will benefit from nursing interventions that can improve outcomes associated with providing care at home.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:24Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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