2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163217
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Response to Patients' Pain Communication
Author(s):
McDonald, Deborah Dillon; LaPorta, Matthew; Meadows-Oliver, Mikki
Author Details:
Deborah Dillon McDonald, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Matthew LaPorta; Mikki Meadows-Oliver
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose was to test nurses' response to patients' pain descriptions. Theoretical Framework: Communication accommodation theory suggests that more explicit pain descriptions enhance nurses' understanding of the pain experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 122 medical surgical registered nurses was randomly assigned to read a vignette about a trauma patient in moderately severe pain, and write how they would respond. The vignettes in this posttest only experiment were identical except for the patient's pain description (numeric, personal, or numeric and personal) and patient age (adolescent, adult). Two blind raters content analyzed the responses, giving nurses one point for each of six recommended responses derived prior to the analysis from national pain management guidelines. Groups were compared with analysis of variance. Results: Nurses planned similar numbers of responses across the pain description conditions, with a mean of 2.1 (SD = 1.14) out of six recommended pain management responses. The percentage of nurses planning to use each of the responses included 45.9% further assessing the pain, 29.5% administering the analgesic bolus, 4.1% administering the bolus until an acceptable level of pain was reached or at least 50% of the pain was relieved, 43.4% providing an adjuvant to the opioid analgesic, 27.9% reassessing the response to the pain treatments, and 55.7% collaborating with a physician for an increased analgesic dose or decreased interval or both. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses did not respond with more pain management strategies when the patient described pain in his own words, or in his own words and with a pain intensity scale. Nurses planned few strategies overall to respond to moderately severe pain problems. Patients' pain descriptions and the 0 to 10 pain intensity scale merely provide a starting point for communication between patients and practitioners as they work together to reduce or eliminate pain.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Response to Patients' Pain Communicationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMcDonald, Deborah Dillonen_US
dc.contributor.authorLaPorta, Matthewen_US
dc.contributor.authorMeadows-Oliver, Mikkien_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Dillon McDonald, RN, PhD, Associate Professor, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: deborah.mcdonald@uconn.edu; Matthew LaPorta; Mikki Meadows-Oliveren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163217-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose was to test nurses' response to patients' pain descriptions. Theoretical Framework: Communication accommodation theory suggests that more explicit pain descriptions enhance nurses' understanding of the pain experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A convenience sample of 122 medical surgical registered nurses was randomly assigned to read a vignette about a trauma patient in moderately severe pain, and write how they would respond. The vignettes in this posttest only experiment were identical except for the patient's pain description (numeric, personal, or numeric and personal) and patient age (adolescent, adult). Two blind raters content analyzed the responses, giving nurses one point for each of six recommended responses derived prior to the analysis from national pain management guidelines. Groups were compared with analysis of variance. Results: Nurses planned similar numbers of responses across the pain description conditions, with a mean of 2.1 (SD = 1.14) out of six recommended pain management responses. The percentage of nurses planning to use each of the responses included 45.9% further assessing the pain, 29.5% administering the analgesic bolus, 4.1% administering the bolus until an acceptable level of pain was reached or at least 50% of the pain was relieved, 43.4% providing an adjuvant to the opioid analgesic, 27.9% reassessing the response to the pain treatments, and 55.7% collaborating with a physician for an increased analgesic dose or decreased interval or both. Conclusions and Implications: Nurses did not respond with more pain management strategies when the patient described pain in his own words, or in his own words and with a pain intensity scale. Nurses planned few strategies overall to respond to moderately severe pain problems. Patients' pain descriptions and the 0 to 10 pain intensity scale merely provide a starting point for communication between patients and practitioners as they work together to reduce or eliminate pain.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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