Nurses' Descriptions of Ideal Home Nursing Care for Technology Dependent Children and Their Families

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163219
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Descriptions of Ideal Home Nursing Care for Technology Dependent Children and Their Families
Author(s):
Mendes, Michele A.
Author Details:
Michele A. Mendes, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Boston College Maternal Child Health, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: mendes@bc.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Ideal home nursing care will be examined from the perspective of experienced and successful home care nurses for the purpose of describing the nursing interventions used by these nurses to meet the needs of technology dependent children and their families. Background: Technology dependent children have extensive and continuous health care needs that result from developmental or physical disabilities, requiring them to be dependent on medical technology (eg. mechanical ventilators, apnea monitors) sometimes temporarily but often throughout their lives. Technology dependent children and their families present complex nursing care needs. Existing research provides nurses with an understanding of the experiences and difficulties faced by these families, yet there are few studies that address the ambiguity of home nursing practice or that describe specific nursing interventions that can be incorporated into the care of these children and their families. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive design is being used to elicit descriptions of ideal home nursing care from the perspective of successful nurses to answer these research questions: 1. How do nurses describe ideal home nursing care for technology dependent children, their parents and families? 2. How do nurses interact and intervene with technology dependent children and their families to meet the expectations of their parents? Formal, semi-structured interviews with 12 experienced home care nurses are planned. Data will be collected in two ways; audiotapes of the interview and hand written field notes. Data will be managed using data driven content analysis. Results: Analysis of the verbatim interview transcriptions will result in a list of successful nursing interventions described by the participants. Conclusions and Implications: This knowledge has implications for nursing practice with technology dependent children and their families, allowing for a better understanding of nursing care practices that can be incorporated into home care nursing orientation and continuing education programs.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Descriptions of Ideal Home Nursing Care for Technology Dependent Children and Their Familiesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorMendes, Michele A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMichele A. Mendes, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Boston College Maternal Child Health, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: mendes@bc.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163219-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Ideal home nursing care will be examined from the perspective of experienced and successful home care nurses for the purpose of describing the nursing interventions used by these nurses to meet the needs of technology dependent children and their families. Background: Technology dependent children have extensive and continuous health care needs that result from developmental or physical disabilities, requiring them to be dependent on medical technology (eg. mechanical ventilators, apnea monitors) sometimes temporarily but often throughout their lives. Technology dependent children and their families present complex nursing care needs. Existing research provides nurses with an understanding of the experiences and difficulties faced by these families, yet there are few studies that address the ambiguity of home nursing practice or that describe specific nursing interventions that can be incorporated into the care of these children and their families. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive design is being used to elicit descriptions of ideal home nursing care from the perspective of successful nurses to answer these research questions: 1. How do nurses describe ideal home nursing care for technology dependent children, their parents and families? 2. How do nurses interact and intervene with technology dependent children and their families to meet the expectations of their parents? Formal, semi-structured interviews with 12 experienced home care nurses are planned. Data will be collected in two ways; audiotapes of the interview and hand written field notes. Data will be managed using data driven content analysis. Results: Analysis of the verbatim interview transcriptions will result in a list of successful nursing interventions described by the participants. Conclusions and Implications: This knowledge has implications for nursing practice with technology dependent children and their families, allowing for a better understanding of nursing care practices that can be incorporated into home care nursing orientation and continuing education programs.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:32Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:32Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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