2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163225
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Comparison of Three Interventions to Increase Walking in Sedentary Women
Author(s):
Nies, Mary A.; Partridge, Ty
Author Details:
Mary A. Nies, PhD, FAAN, FAAHB, Assistant Vice President of Health Sciences for Research in Community Health, Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: mary.nies@stonybrook.edu; Ty Partridge, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to increase walking activity in sedentary European American and African American women. Three 1 year interventions, video education/control, brief telephone call, and telephone counseling, were designed to help women begin and maintain a walking program. Theoretical Framework: A conceptual model linking the psychosocial determinants, environmental factors, and host factors with physical activity, physiological health, and psychological health was used to guide the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Randomized clinical trial. Sample: Women (N = 253) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: video education/control; brief telephone calls with no counseling; and telephone calls with counseling. Setting: Metropolitan community. Measurements: Physical activity level was measured with an 11-point scale, the 7 day physical activity recall, and the Rockport 1-mile walk test. Mood was measured with the profile of mood status (POMS). Analysis: A latent growth curve (LGC) modeling approach was employed to assess the relationship between time and intervention group membership across domains of outcome variables. Results: Telephone counseling, brief telephone calls, and video education/control was equally successful in increasing amount of walking, speed, and in reducing negative mood. Conclusions and Implications: Although there was no difference between the groups, women decreased their time to walk one mile and improved their mood. Study outcomes support recommendations for integrating physical activity into one's daily life. The use of low cost minimal intensity interventions, especially with women, may have advantages over programs that require structure, transportation, money, and time away from the home. All 3 interventions appear to be a cost effective means of increasing physical activity for previously sedentary women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleComparison of Three Interventions to Increase Walking in Sedentary Womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorNies, Mary A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPartridge, Tyen_US
dc.author.detailsMary A. Nies, PhD, FAAN, FAAHB, Assistant Vice President of Health Sciences for Research in Community Health, Stony Brook University, Health Sciences Center, Stony Brook, New York, USA, email: mary.nies@stonybrook.edu; Ty Partridge, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163225-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to increase walking activity in sedentary European American and African American women. Three 1 year interventions, video education/control, brief telephone call, and telephone counseling, were designed to help women begin and maintain a walking program. Theoretical Framework: A conceptual model linking the psychosocial determinants, environmental factors, and host factors with physical activity, physiological health, and psychological health was used to guide the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Randomized clinical trial. Sample: Women (N = 253) were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 groups: video education/control; brief telephone calls with no counseling; and telephone calls with counseling. Setting: Metropolitan community. Measurements: Physical activity level was measured with an 11-point scale, the 7 day physical activity recall, and the Rockport 1-mile walk test. Mood was measured with the profile of mood status (POMS). Analysis: A latent growth curve (LGC) modeling approach was employed to assess the relationship between time and intervention group membership across domains of outcome variables. Results: Telephone counseling, brief telephone calls, and video education/control was equally successful in increasing amount of walking, speed, and in reducing negative mood. Conclusions and Implications: Although there was no difference between the groups, women decreased their time to walk one mile and improved their mood. Study outcomes support recommendations for integrating physical activity into one's daily life. The use of low cost minimal intensity interventions, especially with women, may have advantages over programs that require structure, transportation, money, and time away from the home. All 3 interventions appear to be a cost effective means of increasing physical activity for previously sedentary women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:38Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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