2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163230
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Meaning and Experience of Maternal Caregiving in Ghanaian Culture
Author(s):
Pollard, Denise; Byrne, Mary W.
Author Details:
Denise Pollard, MPH, DNSc candidate, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Columbia University School of Nursing, Long Beach, New York, USA, email: mp477@columbia.edu; Mary W. Byrne, MPH, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The broad goal is to learn the native perspective on the experiences and meaning of maternal caregiving practices in Ghana, West Africa. Background: Knowledge of maternal care practices in West Africa is largely tacit with little available in the professional literature. There are now more immigrants coming to the Unites States from Africa than at any time in the past. Early caregiving relationships, their formation, quality, and related developmental issues are the cornerstone and focus of pediatric primary care. Health care providers to women and children need to understand the perspective of their West African patients in order to provide culturally appropriate care. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Following approval of the IRBs at Columbia University and the University of Ghana Medical School, women with infants or toddlers were recruited from six families in the Greater Accra Region in Ghana. Written consents were obtained from caregivers and from a husband or head of household as required by cultural norms. This qualitative study used the Spradley (1979, 1980) ethnographic approach, the developmental research sequence (DRS), combined with the visual anthropology technique of photographic interviewing (Collier & Collier, 1986). Data were collected by parallel participant observation and in-depth interviewing in the homes and compounds of participants. Photographs were taken in natural settings by participants and used as prompts during interviews. Results: Early domains identified were ways to bathe, feed and create physical contact with baby. Taxonomic and componential analyses led to themes of: early gender socialization, physical contact and emotional closeness, hardship, spirituality, and caring which was comprised of hygiene, social activities and training. Conclusions and Implications: This research adds to existing knowledge of cross cultural maternal caregiving practices. This understanding can influence health care providers who work in culturally diverse pediatric health care settings providing services to West African immigrants.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Meaning and Experience of Maternal Caregiving in Ghanaian Cultureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPollard, Deniseen_US
dc.contributor.authorByrne, Mary W.en_US
dc.author.detailsDenise Pollard, MPH, DNSc candidate, Pediatric Nurse Practitioner, Columbia University School of Nursing, Long Beach, New York, USA, email: mp477@columbia.edu; Mary W. Byrne, MPH, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163230-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The broad goal is to learn the native perspective on the experiences and meaning of maternal caregiving practices in Ghana, West Africa. Background: Knowledge of maternal care practices in West Africa is largely tacit with little available in the professional literature. There are now more immigrants coming to the Unites States from Africa than at any time in the past. Early caregiving relationships, their formation, quality, and related developmental issues are the cornerstone and focus of pediatric primary care. Health care providers to women and children need to understand the perspective of their West African patients in order to provide culturally appropriate care. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Following approval of the IRBs at Columbia University and the University of Ghana Medical School, women with infants or toddlers were recruited from six families in the Greater Accra Region in Ghana. Written consents were obtained from caregivers and from a husband or head of household as required by cultural norms. This qualitative study used the Spradley (1979, 1980) ethnographic approach, the developmental research sequence (DRS), combined with the visual anthropology technique of photographic interviewing (Collier & Collier, 1986). Data were collected by parallel participant observation and in-depth interviewing in the homes and compounds of participants. Photographs were taken in natural settings by participants and used as prompts during interviews. Results: Early domains identified were ways to bathe, feed and create physical contact with baby. Taxonomic and componential analyses led to themes of: early gender socialization, physical contact and emotional closeness, hardship, spirituality, and caring which was comprised of hygiene, social activities and training. Conclusions and Implications: This research adds to existing knowledge of cross cultural maternal caregiving practices. This understanding can influence health care providers who work in culturally diverse pediatric health care settings providing services to West African immigrants.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:43Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:43Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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