2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163232
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Stigma on the HIV Risk Behavior of Rural Men Who Have Sex with Men
Author(s):
Preston, Deborah Bray; D'Augelli, Anthony R.; Starks, Michael
Author Details:
Deborah Bray Preston, PhD, Professor Emerita, Penn State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dqp@psu.edu: Anthony R. D'Augelli, PhD; Michael Starks, MS
Abstract:
Purpose: Most studies of the HIV-related risky sexual behaviors of men who have sex with men (MSM) have been conducted in cities. Few have documented the risky behaviors of rural men despite evidence that rural HIV is increasing. Even fewer have addressed issues of stigma and risk behavior. The primary goal of this study was to test a model which combined Goffman's theories of stigma, reference group theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action to explain the individual and social determinants of sexual risk in rural MSM. We hypothesized that the perceived stigma emanating from families, health care providers and the communities of rural MSM would indirectly effect their risk behavior through their mental health status (self-esteem, internalized homophobia) and their sexual sensation-seeking behavior. Theoretical Framework: As above. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Because rural MSM are hidden, a convenience sample of 414 MSM from rural counties in Pennsylvania was obtained from the mailing list of a political action group and by means of chain-referral sampling through health and social organizations. The respondents were surveyed anonymously using a self-administered questionnaire. Measures of all variables were piloted on a sample of 40 rural men living in another state. Factor analysis and alpha reliability were obtained for all measures. A path analysis was conducted to test the theoretical model. Results: Respondents average age was 42 and 78% had a post-high school education. Most (89%) were white/non-Hispanic. Over 52% reported high risk sexual behavior while 40% reported moderate to high sensation-seeking. Sensation seeking directly effected risk behavior while the effects of community and family stigma were mediated by the effects of mental health variables. Conclusions and Implications: Stigma was related to MSM's low self-esteem and high internalized homophobia both of which increased sensation-seeking behavior and risk. Stigma needs to be addressed with individuals, families and health care providers in order to facilitate risk reduction in rural MSM.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Stigma on the HIV Risk Behavior of Rural Men Who Have Sex with Menen_GB
dc.contributor.authorPreston, Deborah Brayen_US
dc.contributor.authorD'Augelli, Anthony R.en_US
dc.contributor.authorStarks, Michaelen_US
dc.author.detailsDeborah Bray Preston, PhD, Professor Emerita, Penn State University, School of Nursing, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: dqp@psu.edu: Anthony R. D'Augelli, PhD; Michael Starks, MSen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163232-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Most studies of the HIV-related risky sexual behaviors of men who have sex with men (MSM) have been conducted in cities. Few have documented the risky behaviors of rural men despite evidence that rural HIV is increasing. Even fewer have addressed issues of stigma and risk behavior. The primary goal of this study was to test a model which combined Goffman's theories of stigma, reference group theory and the Theory of Reasoned Action to explain the individual and social determinants of sexual risk in rural MSM. We hypothesized that the perceived stigma emanating from families, health care providers and the communities of rural MSM would indirectly effect their risk behavior through their mental health status (self-esteem, internalized homophobia) and their sexual sensation-seeking behavior. Theoretical Framework: As above. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Because rural MSM are hidden, a convenience sample of 414 MSM from rural counties in Pennsylvania was obtained from the mailing list of a political action group and by means of chain-referral sampling through health and social organizations. The respondents were surveyed anonymously using a self-administered questionnaire. Measures of all variables were piloted on a sample of 40 rural men living in another state. Factor analysis and alpha reliability were obtained for all measures. A path analysis was conducted to test the theoretical model. Results: Respondents average age was 42 and 78% had a post-high school education. Most (89%) were white/non-Hispanic. Over 52% reported high risk sexual behavior while 40% reported moderate to high sensation-seeking. Sensation seeking directly effected risk behavior while the effects of community and family stigma were mediated by the effects of mental health variables. Conclusions and Implications: Stigma was related to MSM's low self-esteem and high internalized homophobia both of which increased sensation-seeking behavior and risk. Stigma needs to be addressed with individuals, families and health care providers in order to facilitate risk reduction in rural MSM.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:45Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:45Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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