Health Professional Workforce Dynamics Across Four Professions in a Small Rural State

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163234
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Health Professional Workforce Dynamics Across Four Professions in a Small Rural State
Author(s):
Rambur, Betty; Palumbo, Mary Val; Ross, Robert H.; Wilcke, Jr., Burton
Author Details:
Betty Rambur, DNSc, RN, Dean/Professor of Nursing, University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: brambur@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN; Robert H. Ross, PhD; Burton Wilcke Jr., PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore health workforce dynamics across four health professionals: nurses, medical laboratorians, respiratory therapists, and radiographers. Theoretical Framework: Principles of Human Capital (Schultz, 1981). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This survey design used 1) state relicensure data and 2) a statewide workforce assessment of all hospitals in a small rural state (response rates: respiratory therapists, 65%, n=100; medical laboratorians, 51%, n=241; radiographers, 58%, n=315; registered nurses, 65%, n=5805; hospitals 75%, n=12). The relicensure survey utilized the minimum data set recommended for workforce assessment by Colleagues in Caring. The statewide assessment tool was developed based on an extensive literature review, tested for content validity through a panel of experts, and pilot tested (all detailed in Medical Research and Review, in press). Descriptive statistics analyzed demographics, job satisfaction, intention to leave job/profession, facility vacancy and turnover rates by discipline. Results: Nurses were, on average, older (mean 48 years) and less diverse in gender (94% female), while radiographers had the highest percentage of non-Caucasians (11%). Medical laboratorians had the highest percentage of Bachelor's degrees in their field (56%). Nurses had the highest percentage of Master's degrees (5%). Radiographers and nurses reported the highest satisfaction (55%, 54%) with their current position; respiratory therapists were the most likely to intend to leave their position in the next year (28%). Of those who reported being "likely to leave" their position, Medical Laboratorians most frequently indicated job stress as a reason (45%). In the hospital setting, nurses had the highest vacancy rates (10%) and Medical Laboratorians had the highest turnover rates (10 -13%). Conclusions and Implications: While the nursing shortage has received growing attention, these data suggest corollary challenges across these professions. Collectively, these workforce dynamics have the potential to impact the effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams. Lessons drawn from nursing shortage interventions should be shared and tested across disciplines.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleHealth Professional Workforce Dynamics Across Four Professions in a Small Rural Stateen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRambur, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen_US
dc.contributor.authorRoss, Robert H.en_US
dc.contributor.authorWilcke, Jr., Burtonen_US
dc.author.detailsBetty Rambur, DNSc, RN, Dean/Professor of Nursing, University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: brambur@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN; Robert H. Ross, PhD; Burton Wilcke Jr., PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163234-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore health workforce dynamics across four health professionals: nurses, medical laboratorians, respiratory therapists, and radiographers. Theoretical Framework: Principles of Human Capital (Schultz, 1981). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This survey design used 1) state relicensure data and 2) a statewide workforce assessment of all hospitals in a small rural state (response rates: respiratory therapists, 65%, n=100; medical laboratorians, 51%, n=241; radiographers, 58%, n=315; registered nurses, 65%, n=5805; hospitals 75%, n=12). The relicensure survey utilized the minimum data set recommended for workforce assessment by Colleagues in Caring. The statewide assessment tool was developed based on an extensive literature review, tested for content validity through a panel of experts, and pilot tested (all detailed in Medical Research and Review, in press). Descriptive statistics analyzed demographics, job satisfaction, intention to leave job/profession, facility vacancy and turnover rates by discipline. Results: Nurses were, on average, older (mean 48 years) and less diverse in gender (94% female), while radiographers had the highest percentage of non-Caucasians (11%). Medical laboratorians had the highest percentage of Bachelor's degrees in their field (56%). Nurses had the highest percentage of Master's degrees (5%). Radiographers and nurses reported the highest satisfaction (55%, 54%) with their current position; respiratory therapists were the most likely to intend to leave their position in the next year (28%). Of those who reported being "likely to leave" their position, Medical Laboratorians most frequently indicated job stress as a reason (45%). In the hospital setting, nurses had the highest vacancy rates (10%) and Medical Laboratorians had the highest turnover rates (10 -13%). Conclusions and Implications: While the nursing shortage has received growing attention, these data suggest corollary challenges across these professions. Collectively, these workforce dynamics have the potential to impact the effectiveness of interdisciplinary teams. Lessons drawn from nursing shortage interventions should be shared and tested across disciplines.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:47Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:47Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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