2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163235
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perceptions of an Ideal Career vs. Perceptions of Six Health Careers
Author(s):
Rambur, Betty; Palumbo, Mary Val
Author Details:
Betty Rambur, DNSc, RN, Dean/Professor of Nursing, University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: brambur@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast young adults' (age 18-24 years) perception of an ideal career versus their perception of six health professions: nursing, medical laboratory science, pharmacy, respiratory therapy, radiation technology, and physical therapy. Theoretical Framework: Csikszenthihalyi's 1990 framework of Flow and the optimal experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Survey. Sample: A convenience sample of 720 18-24 year olds recruited from job fairs and community events between Jan 2005 and Sept 2005. Setting: One metropolitan statistical area within a rural, northeastern state and two less urbanized adjacent communities. Measures: Developed by May et al 1991, the instrument measures 17 parallel items on a 5 point Likert scale and has been assessed for reliability (coefficient alpha .81-.84) and content validity through a panel of experts. Analysis: Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests, with Bonferoni adjusted alpha significance at p < 0.0028. Results: All six health professions were perceived as significantly less desirable (p< 0.001) than the ideal career in the area of "being respected". All six health careers were perceived as "working with high technology" more than was desired in an ideal career. "Care for people" was the third highest attribute of an ideal career and only pharmacy and radiation technology were found to be statistically significantly lower in this area (p< 0.001). Only nurses were significantly perceived (p< 0.001 ) as having job security that matched the ideal. Additional similarities and differences are detailed. Results: All six health professions were perceived as significantly less desirable (p< 0.001) than the ideal career in the area of "being respected". All six health careers were perceived as "working with high technology" more than was desired in an ideal career. "Care for people" was the third highest attribute of an ideal career and only pharmacy and radiation technology were found to be statistically significantly lower in this area (p< 0.001). Only nurses were significantly perceived (p< 0.001 ) as having job security that matched the ideal. Additional similarities and differences are detailed. Conclusions and Implications: Healthcare is increasingly dependent on highly collaborative multidisciplinary teams. Inaccurate perceptions likely hamper the development of an adequate pipeline of new recruits to the professions, which has the potential to impact all health disciplines. Strategies to address this challenge and areas for further research are outlined.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerceptions of an Ideal Career vs. Perceptions of Six Health Careersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorRambur, Bettyen_US
dc.contributor.authorPalumbo, Mary Valen_US
dc.author.detailsBetty Rambur, DNSc, RN, Dean/Professor of Nursing, University of Vermont College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Burlington, Vermont, USA, email: brambur@uvm.edu; Mary Val Palumbo, DNP, APRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163235-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to compare and contrast young adults' (age 18-24 years) perception of an ideal career versus their perception of six health professions: nursing, medical laboratory science, pharmacy, respiratory therapy, radiation technology, and physical therapy. Theoretical Framework: Csikszenthihalyi's 1990 framework of Flow and the optimal experience. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design: Survey. Sample: A convenience sample of 720 18-24 year olds recruited from job fairs and community events between Jan 2005 and Sept 2005. Setting: One metropolitan statistical area within a rural, northeastern state and two less urbanized adjacent communities. Measures: Developed by May et al 1991, the instrument measures 17 parallel items on a 5 point Likert scale and has been assessed for reliability (coefficient alpha .81-.84) and content validity through a panel of experts. Analysis: Descriptive statistics and paired t-tests, with Bonferoni adjusted alpha significance at p < 0.0028. Results: All six health professions were perceived as significantly less desirable (p< 0.001) than the ideal career in the area of "being respected". All six health careers were perceived as "working with high technology" more than was desired in an ideal career. "Care for people" was the third highest attribute of an ideal career and only pharmacy and radiation technology were found to be statistically significantly lower in this area (p< 0.001). Only nurses were significantly perceived (p< 0.001 ) as having job security that matched the ideal. Additional similarities and differences are detailed. Results: All six health professions were perceived as significantly less desirable (p< 0.001) than the ideal career in the area of "being respected". All six health careers were perceived as "working with high technology" more than was desired in an ideal career. "Care for people" was the third highest attribute of an ideal career and only pharmacy and radiation technology were found to be statistically significantly lower in this area (p< 0.001). Only nurses were significantly perceived (p< 0.001 ) as having job security that matched the ideal. Additional similarities and differences are detailed. Conclusions and Implications: Healthcare is increasingly dependent on highly collaborative multidisciplinary teams. Inaccurate perceptions likely hamper the development of an adequate pipeline of new recruits to the professions, which has the potential to impact all health disciplines. Strategies to address this challenge and areas for further research are outlined.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:49Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:49Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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