Menopause Effects on Adipokines and Insulin Resistance (IR) in Age- and BMI-Matched Volunteers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163236
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Menopause Effects on Adipokines and Insulin Resistance (IR) in Age- and BMI-Matched Volunteers
Author(s):
Reame, Nancy E.; Rouen, Patricia; Lukacz, Jane
Author Details:
Nancy E. Reame, MSN, PhD, FAAN, Professor and Director, DNSc Program, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: nr2188@columbia.edu; Patricia Rouen, MSN, NP; Jane Lukacs
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the influence of menopause vs. aging on adipokine (AD) concentrations in healthy mid-life women. Theoretical Framework: Central adiposity increases the risk for insulin resistance (IR), a key feature of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes (DM), and is more pronounced in women. Aging accelerates these risks, but to what extent estrogen loss at menopause contributes is unclear. Adiponectin, a fat cell peptide, may be a biomarker and early signal of IR, MS, and type 2DM. Adiponectin levels are sexually dimorphic implying a role for the sex steroids. Three human studies to date have been inconclusive and not well controlled. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using data from a parent study, we employed a cross-sectional group design to analyze by ANOVA new data from archived blood samples of three groups of women differing by age and menopause status. The older cycling group (OC n=21) was age-matched to a postmenopause group (PM n=21), but has similar follicular phase estrogen values as younger aged controls (YC n = 23). Measures of leptin, insulin, adiponectin, and fasting glucose were assessed. Insulin resistance was determined by the HOMA method. Results: Leptin and measures of insulin resistance were similar across all three groups. Adiponectin was highest and different in the Postmenopause group (p =< 0.05). High BMI showed opposing effects on leptin and AD regardless of reproductive status. Conclusions and Implications: Estrogen in the reproductive years may act as a suppressor of adiponectin. The early postmenopause rise in AD may deter insulin resistance in non-obese women. This new hypothesis for how healthy body weight protects against the metabolic syndrome requires further testing in a larger sample, incorporating measures of central and peripheral adiposity.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMenopause Effects on Adipokines and Insulin Resistance (IR) in Age- and BMI-Matched Volunteersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorReame, Nancy E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorRouen, Patriciaen_US
dc.contributor.authorLukacz, Janeen_US
dc.author.detailsNancy E. Reame, MSN, PhD, FAAN, Professor and Director, DNSc Program, Columbia University School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: nr2188@columbia.edu; Patricia Rouen, MSN, NP; Jane Lukacsen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163236-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this pilot study was to determine the influence of menopause vs. aging on adipokine (AD) concentrations in healthy mid-life women. Theoretical Framework: Central adiposity increases the risk for insulin resistance (IR), a key feature of the metabolic syndrome (MS) and type 2 diabetes (DM), and is more pronounced in women. Aging accelerates these risks, but to what extent estrogen loss at menopause contributes is unclear. Adiponectin, a fat cell peptide, may be a biomarker and early signal of IR, MS, and type 2DM. Adiponectin levels are sexually dimorphic implying a role for the sex steroids. Three human studies to date have been inconclusive and not well controlled. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using data from a parent study, we employed a cross-sectional group design to analyze by ANOVA new data from archived blood samples of three groups of women differing by age and menopause status. The older cycling group (OC n=21) was age-matched to a postmenopause group (PM n=21), but has similar follicular phase estrogen values as younger aged controls (YC n = 23). Measures of leptin, insulin, adiponectin, and fasting glucose were assessed. Insulin resistance was determined by the HOMA method. Results: Leptin and measures of insulin resistance were similar across all three groups. Adiponectin was highest and different in the Postmenopause group (p =< 0.05). High BMI showed opposing effects on leptin and AD regardless of reproductive status. Conclusions and Implications: Estrogen in the reproductive years may act as a suppressor of adiponectin. The early postmenopause rise in AD may deter insulin resistance in non-obese women. This new hypothesis for how healthy body weight protects against the metabolic syndrome requires further testing in a larger sample, incorporating measures of central and peripheral adiposity.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:50Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:50Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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