Factors Affecting Job Stress, Job Strain and Job Satisfaction among Acute Care Nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163239
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Factors Affecting Job Stress, Job Strain and Job Satisfaction among Acute Care Nurses
Author(s):
Salmond, Susan W.
Author Details:
Susan W. Salmond, RN, EdD, CNAA, Associate Dean Planning & Graduate Studies, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: salmonsu@umdnj.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine personal and organizational factors which impact job stress, job strain and job satisfaction. Theoretical Framework: Karasek's job demand-control-support model. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This descriptive multivariate design examined personal factors of educational level, certification level, continuing education credits, years of experience, and perceived competence (self-efficacy) and organizational factors of social support, professional practice environment, type of hospital, and type of unit as predictors of job stress, job satisfaction and job strain. Advertisements were placed in the Orthopaedic Nursing Journal inviting hospital participation. On-site coordinators distributed survey packets to a randomized sample of 80% of the eligible nursing staff on the unit. Respondents completed four surveys, the Job Content Questionnaire measuring job stress and strain, the Professional Nursing Practice Environment Questionnaire measuring environmental factors, and the Orthopaedic Nursing Role Responsibilities Scale measuring perceived self-efficacy to perform orthopaedic nursing role responsibilities, and a demographic questionnaire collecting both personal and unit based data. Data was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis, MANOVA and path analysis. Results: Forty eight hospitals agreed to participate and 40 of these from 20 different states returned data. A total of 437 staff nurses were included in the final sample. The strongest predictor of satisfaction was the Professional Practice Environment Score (PES). PES scores were higher in magnet hospitals and on orthopaedic specialty units. Karasek's model indicating that job stress is transformed by decision latitude (active stress) was supported. Those scoring in the active stress quadrant had the highest perceived self-efficacy, highest PES score and highest levels of social support. Path Analysis findings supported a revised model of examining job satisfaction, job stress and job strain. Conclusions and Implications: Data from this study strongly supports interventions focusing on enhancing the professional practice environment as a means to increasing job satisfaction and decreasing job stress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFactors Affecting Job Stress, Job Strain and Job Satisfaction among Acute Care Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSalmond, Susan W.en_US
dc.author.detailsSusan W. Salmond, RN, EdD, CNAA, Associate Dean Planning & Graduate Studies, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: salmonsu@umdnj.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163239-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine personal and organizational factors which impact job stress, job strain and job satisfaction. Theoretical Framework: Karasek's job demand-control-support model. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This descriptive multivariate design examined personal factors of educational level, certification level, continuing education credits, years of experience, and perceived competence (self-efficacy) and organizational factors of social support, professional practice environment, type of hospital, and type of unit as predictors of job stress, job satisfaction and job strain. Advertisements were placed in the Orthopaedic Nursing Journal inviting hospital participation. On-site coordinators distributed survey packets to a randomized sample of 80% of the eligible nursing staff on the unit. Respondents completed four surveys, the Job Content Questionnaire measuring job stress and strain, the Professional Nursing Practice Environment Questionnaire measuring environmental factors, and the Orthopaedic Nursing Role Responsibilities Scale measuring perceived self-efficacy to perform orthopaedic nursing role responsibilities, and a demographic questionnaire collecting both personal and unit based data. Data was analyzed using correlation and regression analysis, MANOVA and path analysis. Results: Forty eight hospitals agreed to participate and 40 of these from 20 different states returned data. A total of 437 staff nurses were included in the final sample. The strongest predictor of satisfaction was the Professional Practice Environment Score (PES). PES scores were higher in magnet hospitals and on orthopaedic specialty units. Karasek's model indicating that job stress is transformed by decision latitude (active stress) was supported. Those scoring in the active stress quadrant had the highest perceived self-efficacy, highest PES score and highest levels of social support. Path Analysis findings supported a revised model of examining job satisfaction, job stress and job strain. Conclusions and Implications: Data from this study strongly supports interventions focusing on enhancing the professional practice environment as a means to increasing job satisfaction and decreasing job stress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:53Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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