2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163240
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Work Environment and Job-Related Stress Among Home Healthcare Nurses
Author(s):
Samia, Linda W.
Author Details:
Linda W. Samia, RN, PhDc, Project Director, University of Massachusetts Boston College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: linda.samia@umb.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Job stress adversely affects the quality of patient care, how nurses feel about their jobs, and whether they will remain in their jobs. The purpose of this multiple case study was to describe the effect of the home healthcare work environment on job-related stress experienced by nurses with the specific aims to: 1) identify stressors nurses describe in their practice and work environments 2) identify characteristics of the work environment that moderate the levels of job-related stress experienced by nurses 3) explicate ways nurse autonomy and adaptation in the work environment relate to job stress 4) describe why nurses who work full time and have more years of tenure report higher levels of job-related stress. Background: Although the work environment of nurses in hospital settings has been studied extensively, the environment of home healthcare nurses is quite different as it extends into patients' homes and organizational resources and support are remote. Findings from the Home Healthcare Nurse Job Retention Study provided evidence that nurses' job stress was one work environment factor with variability among agencies. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Yin's embedded case study design was applied to examine the work environments of two home healthcare agencies with contrasting scores for stress and workload reported from the primary Retention Study. Qualitative data was collected by semi-structured interviews with nurses, managers, and administrators and by direct field observation and focus group interviews with nurses. Data was analyzed using pattern matching and grounded theory. Results: Home healthcare nurses shared common perceptions of job stressors. Nurses described variability in characteristics of management and peer support, active participation in decision-making and support for autonomy that affected their ability to adapt in stressful situations. Conclusions and Implications: Although generalizability from case studies is limited findings from this study suggest that specific work environment interventions may help to moderate nurse responses to job stress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Work Environment and Job-Related Stress Among Home Healthcare Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSamia, Linda W.en_US
dc.author.detailsLinda W. Samia, RN, PhDc, Project Director, University of Massachusetts Boston College of Nursing and Health Sciences, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: linda.samia@umb.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163240-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Job stress adversely affects the quality of patient care, how nurses feel about their jobs, and whether they will remain in their jobs. The purpose of this multiple case study was to describe the effect of the home healthcare work environment on job-related stress experienced by nurses with the specific aims to: 1) identify stressors nurses describe in their practice and work environments 2) identify characteristics of the work environment that moderate the levels of job-related stress experienced by nurses 3) explicate ways nurse autonomy and adaptation in the work environment relate to job stress 4) describe why nurses who work full time and have more years of tenure report higher levels of job-related stress. Background: Although the work environment of nurses in hospital settings has been studied extensively, the environment of home healthcare nurses is quite different as it extends into patients' homes and organizational resources and support are remote. Findings from the Home Healthcare Nurse Job Retention Study provided evidence that nurses' job stress was one work environment factor with variability among agencies. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Yin's embedded case study design was applied to examine the work environments of two home healthcare agencies with contrasting scores for stress and workload reported from the primary Retention Study. Qualitative data was collected by semi-structured interviews with nurses, managers, and administrators and by direct field observation and focus group interviews with nurses. Data was analyzed using pattern matching and grounded theory. Results: Home healthcare nurses shared common perceptions of job stressors. Nurses described variability in characteristics of management and peer support, active participation in decision-making and support for autonomy that affected their ability to adapt in stressful situations. Conclusions and Implications: Although generalizability from case studies is limited findings from this study suggest that specific work environment interventions may help to moderate nurse responses to job stress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:03:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:03:54Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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