Children's Perceptions of Appropriate Sun Protection Measures: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163249
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Children's Perceptions of Appropriate Sun Protection Measures: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?
Author(s):
Shenuski, Corin A.
Author Details:
Corin A. Shenuski, RN, BSN, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: corin.shenuski@sbcglobal.net
Abstract:
Purpose: Excessive sun exposure during childhood is a major risk factor for melanoma. Drawings have been used to assess children's (4-13 years) perceptions about the sun and skin cancer, but their effectiveness, as an evaluation tool has not been examined. Purpose: 1. Describe children's perceptions of appropriate sun protection measures, 2. Translate standards of dermatology care to second graders 3. Evaluate knowledge gained. Theoretical Framework: In the behavioural factors in causation of skin cancer model, sun-related behavior has behavioral (predispositions, social norms, etc.) as well as non-behavioral (genetics, UVR) causes that are key to the prevention of skin cancer. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design was univariate descriptive. A purposive sample of 15 male and female children of various ethnic backgrounds were recruited from a second grade class. Children were asked to draw a picture showing how they would dress at the beach. A 30-minute age-appropriate sun safety educational program, based on the American Academy of Dermatology standards, was provided. Children then drew how they would dress at the beach. Pre/post educational drawings were analyzed individually and then compared. Results: In pre-educational drawings children wore long-sleeved shirts (13.3%), long pants (13.3%), hats (13.3%), shoes (13.3%), sunglasses (26.7%). Post educational drawings showed substantial increases in all attire: long-sleeved shirts (93.3%), long pants (86.6%), hats (46.7%), shoes (40%), sunglasses (86.7%). Wearing of dark clothing decreased from 86.7% to 46.7% and light clothing increased from none to 46.7%. Use of umbrellas increased from 13.3% to 46.7% and sunscreen use increased from 73.3% to 100 %. Conclusions and Implications: Drawings seem to be a valid method for evaluating knowledge gained from children. If children are taught proper sun behaviors early, they may adopt and maintain life long sun protection practices. Nurses have an excellent opportunity to educate children about sun safe behaviors to help reduce melanoma risk.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleChildren's Perceptions of Appropriate Sun Protection Measures: Is a Picture Worth a Thousand Words?en_GB
dc.contributor.authorShenuski, Corin A.en_US
dc.author.detailsCorin A. Shenuski, RN, BSN, School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: corin.shenuski@sbcglobal.neten_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163249-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Excessive sun exposure during childhood is a major risk factor for melanoma. Drawings have been used to assess children's (4-13 years) perceptions about the sun and skin cancer, but their effectiveness, as an evaluation tool has not been examined. Purpose: 1. Describe children's perceptions of appropriate sun protection measures, 2. Translate standards of dermatology care to second graders 3. Evaluate knowledge gained. Theoretical Framework: In the behavioural factors in causation of skin cancer model, sun-related behavior has behavioral (predispositions, social norms, etc.) as well as non-behavioral (genetics, UVR) causes that are key to the prevention of skin cancer. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Design was univariate descriptive. A purposive sample of 15 male and female children of various ethnic backgrounds were recruited from a second grade class. Children were asked to draw a picture showing how they would dress at the beach. A 30-minute age-appropriate sun safety educational program, based on the American Academy of Dermatology standards, was provided. Children then drew how they would dress at the beach. Pre/post educational drawings were analyzed individually and then compared. Results: In pre-educational drawings children wore long-sleeved shirts (13.3%), long pants (13.3%), hats (13.3%), shoes (13.3%), sunglasses (26.7%). Post educational drawings showed substantial increases in all attire: long-sleeved shirts (93.3%), long pants (86.6%), hats (46.7%), shoes (40%), sunglasses (86.7%). Wearing of dark clothing decreased from 86.7% to 46.7% and light clothing increased from none to 46.7%. Use of umbrellas increased from 13.3% to 46.7% and sunscreen use increased from 73.3% to 100 %. Conclusions and Implications: Drawings seem to be a valid method for evaluating knowledge gained from children. If children are taught proper sun behaviors early, they may adopt and maintain life long sun protection practices. Nurses have an excellent opportunity to educate children about sun safe behaviors to help reduce melanoma risk.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:03Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:03Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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