Workplace Bullying among Newly Licensed Nurses in Massachusetts and the Relationship to Intention to Leave the Organization

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163250
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Workplace Bullying among Newly Licensed Nurses in Massachusetts and the Relationship to Intention to Leave the Organization
Author(s):
Simons, Shellie R.
Author Details:
Shellie R. Simons, PhD (c), Assistant Professor, Rhode Island College, Department of Nursing, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: ssimons@ric.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study has three objectives: 1) to identify the presence of bullying behavior among newly licensed registered nurses; 2) to determine if newly graduated nurses are bullied more than experienced, non-managerial nurses; and 3) to analyze the relationship between bullying and a newly licensed nurse's intention to leave a position. Theoretical Framework: The conceptual framework that guides this study is the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Health Policy (Fawcett and Russell, 2001) and the theory of oppressed group behavior (Freire, 2000). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This retrospective, descriptive study uses a survey adapted from the Negative Acts Questionnaire. Data were collected using a mail survey of 511 randomly selected registered nurses who attained their Massachusetts RN license since 2001. Factor analysis and linear regression are used to analyze the data. Results: The results of this study indicate that 31% of the sample are victims of bullying at work. Principal component factor analysis reveal four constructs to be part of bullying, explaining 56% of the variance. Experienced nurses are equally victimized by bullying behavior as novice nurses. When controlling for other variables, bullying is a significant determinant in predicting intent to leave the organization in this study (B=3.1, p < .0005). Conclusions and Implications: The main finding of this study is that as workplace bullying among newly licensed nurses in Massachusetts increases so does the individual's intent to leave their job. These findings suggest that effective interventions need to be implemented in education, practice and policy to stop workplace bullying and reduce the high rates of registered nurse turnover that contribute to a growing nursing shortage.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWorkplace Bullying among Newly Licensed Nurses in Massachusetts and the Relationship to Intention to Leave the Organizationen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSimons, Shellie R.en_US
dc.author.detailsShellie R. Simons, PhD (c), Assistant Professor, Rhode Island College, Department of Nursing, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: ssimons@ric.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163250-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study has three objectives: 1) to identify the presence of bullying behavior among newly licensed registered nurses; 2) to determine if newly graduated nurses are bullied more than experienced, non-managerial nurses; and 3) to analyze the relationship between bullying and a newly licensed nurse's intention to leave a position. Theoretical Framework: The conceptual framework that guides this study is the Conceptual Model of Nursing and Health Policy (Fawcett and Russell, 2001) and the theory of oppressed group behavior (Freire, 2000). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This retrospective, descriptive study uses a survey adapted from the Negative Acts Questionnaire. Data were collected using a mail survey of 511 randomly selected registered nurses who attained their Massachusetts RN license since 2001. Factor analysis and linear regression are used to analyze the data. Results: The results of this study indicate that 31% of the sample are victims of bullying at work. Principal component factor analysis reveal four constructs to be part of bullying, explaining 56% of the variance. Experienced nurses are equally victimized by bullying behavior as novice nurses. When controlling for other variables, bullying is a significant determinant in predicting intent to leave the organization in this study (B=3.1, p < .0005). Conclusions and Implications: The main finding of this study is that as workplace bullying among newly licensed nurses in Massachusetts increases so does the individual's intent to leave their job. These findings suggest that effective interventions need to be implemented in education, practice and policy to stop workplace bullying and reduce the high rates of registered nurse turnover that contribute to a growing nursing shortage.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:05Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.