Strategies in Caring for Women with Postpartum Psychosis - an interview study with psychiatric nurses

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163251
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Strategies in Caring for Women with Postpartum Psychosis - an interview study with psychiatric nurses
Author(s):
Sjostrom, Bjorn; Engqvist, Inger; Nilsson, Agenta; Nilsson, Kerstin
Author Details:
Bjorn Sjostrom, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Skovde, School of Life Science, Skovde, Sweden, email: Bjorn.Sjostrom@his.se; Inger Engqvist; Agenta Nilssson; Kerstin Nilsson
Abstract:
Purpose: Aim and objective. The aim of this study was to explore strategies in caring for patients with postpartum psychosis used by nurses. Background: Background. The most serious type of psychiatric illness in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. Nearly two in 1000 newly delivered women are stricken by postpartum psychosis. Most of these patients need psychiatric care to recover. While earlier studies point to the need for psychiatric care, knowledge of specific nursing strategies in caring for postpartum psychosis patients remains limited. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Methods. Interviews with ten experienced psychiatric nurses were carried out, transcribed verbatim, and an inductive content analysis was made. Results: The main strategies for care found in this study were: a) To create a patient-nurse relationship and, b) To apply nursing therapeutic interactions. Presence, continuity and nurse-patient partnership contributed to create a relationship and incorporate the rest of the care team. To satisfy the patients' basic needs and feeling of security was the foundation of the nursing therapeutic interaction. Confirmation and giving hope were also used as nursing therapeutics as well as information to the patient and her relatives about her illness. Conclusions and Implications: The conclusion of the study is that strategies used by nurses are a combination of general and psychiatric nursing approaches but there is a lack of specificity in caring knowledge for caring patients with PPP requiring further development.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleStrategies in Caring for Women with Postpartum Psychosis - an interview study with psychiatric nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSjostrom, Bjornen_US
dc.contributor.authorEngqvist, Ingeren_US
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Agentaen_US
dc.contributor.authorNilsson, Kerstinen_US
dc.author.detailsBjorn Sjostrom, PhD, RN, Professor, University of Skovde, School of Life Science, Skovde, Sweden, email: Bjorn.Sjostrom@his.se; Inger Engqvist; Agenta Nilssson; Kerstin Nilssonen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163251-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Aim and objective. The aim of this study was to explore strategies in caring for patients with postpartum psychosis used by nurses. Background: Background. The most serious type of psychiatric illness in connection with childbirth is postpartum psychosis. Nearly two in 1000 newly delivered women are stricken by postpartum psychosis. Most of these patients need psychiatric care to recover. While earlier studies point to the need for psychiatric care, knowledge of specific nursing strategies in caring for postpartum psychosis patients remains limited. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Methods. Interviews with ten experienced psychiatric nurses were carried out, transcribed verbatim, and an inductive content analysis was made. Results: The main strategies for care found in this study were: a) To create a patient-nurse relationship and, b) To apply nursing therapeutic interactions. Presence, continuity and nurse-patient partnership contributed to create a relationship and incorporate the rest of the care team. To satisfy the patients' basic needs and feeling of security was the foundation of the nursing therapeutic interaction. Confirmation and giving hope were also used as nursing therapeutics as well as information to the patient and her relatives about her illness. Conclusions and Implications: The conclusion of the study is that strategies used by nurses are a combination of general and psychiatric nursing approaches but there is a lack of specificity in caring knowledge for caring patients with PPP requiring further development.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:06Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:06Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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