2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163252
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Integration of Disability Content in Nursing Curricula
Author(s):
Smeltzer, Suzanne C.; Dolen, Mary Anne; Robinson-Smith, Gale; Zimmerman, Vanessa
Author Details:
Suzanne C. Smeltzer, RN, EdD, FAAN, Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.smeltzer@villanova.edu; Mary Anne Dolen, RN, DrPH, CHES; Gale Robinson-Smith, PhD, RN; Vanessa Zimmerman, RN, MSN
Abstract:
Purpose: There is growing attention to the health disparities affecting persons with disabilities yet little is known about how nursing programs in the U.S. address these issues in their curricula. This study was conducted to examine the integration of disability-related content in nursing curricula and to describe strategies used by faculty to teach this content to students. Theoretical Framework: The interface model of disability (Goodall, 1992), which integrates the life experience of the persons with disabilities and views disability at the intersection (i.e., interface) of the disabling condition and environmental barriers, served as the framework of this study. The model's focus on is empowerment of the person with a disability, who is considered most knowledgeable about living with the disability, and who defines the problems and seeks or directs solutions. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive survey design was used. A 27-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested by the investigators with input from experts in the field, including persons with disabilities. The national stratified random sample included 1000 schools of nursing. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarize the responses to the survey items. Chi square analyses were used to identify differences in responses by type of school (ADN, diploma and BSN level). Results: The response rate was 23.4%. All respondents reported that they included some disability-related content in their curricula and used nursing textbooks as the most common source of information and teaching tool. Barriers to including more content on disability were lack of time, lack of faculty interest or expertise, and the belief that disability is not an important topic. Conclusions and Implications: Although nearly 60 million people in the U.S. currently live with disabilities, the findings of this study strongly suggest that nursing programs do not adequately address health issues of persons with disability, thus perpetuating the health disparities of this growing group of individuals.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleIntegration of Disability Content in Nursing Curriculaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSmeltzer, Suzanne C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorDolen, Mary Anneen_US
dc.contributor.authorRobinson-Smith, Galeen_US
dc.contributor.authorZimmerman, Vanessaen_US
dc.author.detailsSuzanne C. Smeltzer, RN, EdD, FAAN, Professor, Villanova University, College of Nursing, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: suzanne.smeltzer@villanova.edu; Mary Anne Dolen, RN, DrPH, CHES; Gale Robinson-Smith, PhD, RN; Vanessa Zimmerman, RN, MSNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163252-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: There is growing attention to the health disparities affecting persons with disabilities yet little is known about how nursing programs in the U.S. address these issues in their curricula. This study was conducted to examine the integration of disability-related content in nursing curricula and to describe strategies used by faculty to teach this content to students. Theoretical Framework: The interface model of disability (Goodall, 1992), which integrates the life experience of the persons with disabilities and views disability at the intersection (i.e., interface) of the disabling condition and environmental barriers, served as the framework of this study. The model's focus on is empowerment of the person with a disability, who is considered most knowledgeable about living with the disability, and who defines the problems and seeks or directs solutions. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A descriptive survey design was used. A 27-item questionnaire was developed and pilot tested by the investigators with input from experts in the field, including persons with disabilities. The national stratified random sample included 1000 schools of nursing. Descriptive statistics were used to describe and summarize the responses to the survey items. Chi square analyses were used to identify differences in responses by type of school (ADN, diploma and BSN level). Results: The response rate was 23.4%. All respondents reported that they included some disability-related content in their curricula and used nursing textbooks as the most common source of information and teaching tool. Barriers to including more content on disability were lack of time, lack of faculty interest or expertise, and the belief that disability is not an important topic. Conclusions and Implications: Although nearly 60 million people in the U.S. currently live with disabilities, the findings of this study strongly suggest that nursing programs do not adequately address health issues of persons with disability, thus perpetuating the health disparities of this growing group of individuals.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:07Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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