2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163255
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Organizational Climate and Turnover in ICU Nurses
Author(s):
Stone, Patricia W.; Mooney-Kane, Cathy; Larson, Elaine; Pastor, Diane; Zwanziger, Jack; Dick, Andrew`
Author Details:
Patricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: ps2024@columbia.edu; Cathy Mooney-Kane, MPH; Elaine Larson; Diane Pastor; Jack Zwanziger, PhD; Andrew Dick, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: To investigate causes of nurse turnover including organizational climate (OC) in intensive care units (ICUs) and identify policy implications. Theoretical Framework: This study was guided by theories of job separation, which has been conceptualized as a decision-making process on the part of the employee related to organizational features and perceived employment alternatives. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We used an instrumental variable technique to assess simultaneously the relationship between OC and turnover (measured as intent to leave [ITL]). We estimated ordinary least squares and reduced form regressions to determine the extent of simultaneity bias as well as the sensitivity of our results to the instrumental variable model specification. Data were obtained from multiple sources including nurse surveys, hospital administrative data, public use and Medicare files. Data were analyzed from 837 nurses employed in 39 adult ICUs from 23 hospitals located in 20 separate metropolitan statistical areas. Results: Fifteen percent of the nurses indicated their ITL in the coming year. Based on the structural model, we found that nurses' ITL contributed little if anything directly to OC, but that OC and the tightness of the labor market had significant roles in determining ITL (p values < 0.05). Furthermore, OC was strongly affected by the average regionally adjusted ICU wages, hospital profitability and teaching status (p values < 0.05). There was no direct effect of wages on ITL. Conclusions and Implications: Organizational climate is an important determinant of ITL among ICU nurses. Since we found no direct effect of wages on ITL, increased pay alone without attention to OC is likely insufficient to reduce nurse turnover. Implementing interventions aimed ensuring a positive OC may be a more effective strategy.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleOrganizational Climate and Turnover in ICU Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorStone, Patricia W.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMooney-Kane, Cathyen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarson, Elaineen_US
dc.contributor.authorPastor, Dianeen_US
dc.contributor.authorZwanziger, Jacken_US
dc.contributor.authorDick, Andrew`en_US
dc.author.detailsPatricia W. Stone, PhD, MPH, RN, Assistant Professor, Columbia University, School of Nursing, New York, New York, USA, email: ps2024@columbia.edu; Cathy Mooney-Kane, MPH; Elaine Larson; Diane Pastor; Jack Zwanziger, PhD; Andrew Dick, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163255-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To investigate causes of nurse turnover including organizational climate (OC) in intensive care units (ICUs) and identify policy implications. Theoretical Framework: This study was guided by theories of job separation, which has been conceptualized as a decision-making process on the part of the employee related to organizational features and perceived employment alternatives. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): We used an instrumental variable technique to assess simultaneously the relationship between OC and turnover (measured as intent to leave [ITL]). We estimated ordinary least squares and reduced form regressions to determine the extent of simultaneity bias as well as the sensitivity of our results to the instrumental variable model specification. Data were obtained from multiple sources including nurse surveys, hospital administrative data, public use and Medicare files. Data were analyzed from 837 nurses employed in 39 adult ICUs from 23 hospitals located in 20 separate metropolitan statistical areas. Results: Fifteen percent of the nurses indicated their ITL in the coming year. Based on the structural model, we found that nurses' ITL contributed little if anything directly to OC, but that OC and the tightness of the labor market had significant roles in determining ITL (p values < 0.05). Furthermore, OC was strongly affected by the average regionally adjusted ICU wages, hospital profitability and teaching status (p values < 0.05). There was no direct effect of wages on ITL. Conclusions and Implications: Organizational climate is an important determinant of ITL among ICU nurses. Since we found no direct effect of wages on ITL, increased pay alone without attention to OC is likely insufficient to reduce nurse turnover. Implementing interventions aimed ensuring a positive OC may be a more effective strategy.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:11Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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