2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163258
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Perinatal Morbidity & Preschool Health Conditions
Author(s):
Sullivan, Mary C.; Hawes, Katheleen
Author Details:
Mary C. Sullivan, Ph.D, R.N., University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: mcsullivan@uri.edu; Katheleen Hawes, M.S.
Abstract:
Purpose: Advances in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) care has assured the survival of smaller infants. Compared to preterm children born 10 years earlier, the health of the smaller infants may be improved or compromised. Our purpose was to compare preschool health conditions between two preterm samples grouped by perinatal morbidity and born 10 years apart. Theoretical Framework: The 2004 IOM conceptual model of children's health identifies 3 health domains with multiple interacting influences variably affecting health across development. Prematurity and perinatal morbidity set different pathways toward health conditions. Health conditions are alterations in health both specific and nonspecific. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Both Cohort1 (1985-89) and Cohort2 (1996-99) were grouped as full term; preterm with medical illness < 1000g; preterm with medical illness > =1000g; and preterm with neurological illness. Age 4 health status and conditions were assessed by maternal interview and child assessment with pediatric records validation per research protocol. Health status was categorized as normal, suspect and abnormal; specific health conditions were organized by systems. Results: Perinatal group had a significant effect on health status (Cohort1 ChiSquare=24.8, Cohort2 ChiSquare=27.3; p = .0001). Logistic regression models showed a strong effect of cohort and perinatal group on health status. The combined effect of cohort and group showed that preterms in Cohort2 were 80% less likely to have normal health at age 4 while Cohort1 preterm children were 40% less likely to have normal health. The combined model of cohort and perinatal group was 71% correct in predicting normal health and 51% correct in predicting suspect and abnormal health status. Conclusions and Implications: Children born in the 1990s had a better chance of having normal health than those born a decade earlier. Perinatal morbidity continued physical and neurosensory sequelae at age 4 despite NICU advances. The importance of preschool health status and conditions are in their interrelatedness with IOM domains of functional, social, and behavioral health.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePerinatal Morbidity & Preschool Health Conditionsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Mary C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHawes, Katheleenen_US
dc.author.detailsMary C. Sullivan, Ph.D, R.N., University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: mcsullivan@uri.edu; Katheleen Hawes, M.S.en_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163258-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Advances in Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) care has assured the survival of smaller infants. Compared to preterm children born 10 years earlier, the health of the smaller infants may be improved or compromised. Our purpose was to compare preschool health conditions between two preterm samples grouped by perinatal morbidity and born 10 years apart. Theoretical Framework: The 2004 IOM conceptual model of children's health identifies 3 health domains with multiple interacting influences variably affecting health across development. Prematurity and perinatal morbidity set different pathways toward health conditions. Health conditions are alterations in health both specific and nonspecific. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Both Cohort1 (1985-89) and Cohort2 (1996-99) were grouped as full term; preterm with medical illness < 1000g; preterm with medical illness > =1000g; and preterm with neurological illness. Age 4 health status and conditions were assessed by maternal interview and child assessment with pediatric records validation per research protocol. Health status was categorized as normal, suspect and abnormal; specific health conditions were organized by systems. Results: Perinatal group had a significant effect on health status (Cohort1 ChiSquare=24.8, Cohort2 ChiSquare=27.3; p = .0001). Logistic regression models showed a strong effect of cohort and perinatal group on health status. The combined effect of cohort and group showed that preterms in Cohort2 were 80% less likely to have normal health at age 4 while Cohort1 preterm children were 40% less likely to have normal health. The combined model of cohort and perinatal group was 71% correct in predicting normal health and 51% correct in predicting suspect and abnormal health status. Conclusions and Implications: Children born in the 1990s had a better chance of having normal health than those born a decade earlier. Perinatal morbidity continued physical and neurosensory sequelae at age 4 despite NICU advances. The importance of preschool health status and conditions are in their interrelatedness with IOM domains of functional, social, and behavioral health.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:14Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:14Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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