Medication Reconciliation: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Patient Safety and Preventing Adverse Drug Events

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163259
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Medication Reconciliation: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Patient Safety and Preventing Adverse Drug Events
Author(s):
Swallow, Anne D.; Bull, Jill; Taylor, Glen
Author Details:
Anne D. Swallow, RN MSN, Education Coordinator, Greenwich Hospital, Staff Education, Greenwich, Connecticut, USA, email: anns@greenhosp.org; Jill Bull, RN MA MSN; Glen Taylor, PharmD
Abstract:
Purpose: To design, implement and assess the effectiveness of a medication reconciliation process across the continuum of an inpatient stay. Specific Aim: To reduce the percent of unreconciled medications by 50% at hospital transition points utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach. Theoretical Framework: The Joint Commission for Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) and the Institute for Healthcare (IHI) 100,000 Lives Campaign are both committed to reduction of patient harm from medications through hospital improvement strategies by January 2006. A considerable effort is needed to enhance the culture of patient safety through improved medication processes and reconciliation. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Outcomes research focusing on percent of unreconciled medications across the continuum of care will be utilized for this study. A multidisciplinary team will be in place to determine if a standardized medication reconciliation process is effective in reducing unreconciled medications throughout the inpatient stay. Medication reconciliation begins at admission by obtaining an accurate and complete home medication list from the patient. A process of verification, clarification, and reconciliation occurs at each transition point in the hospital stay. Computerized clinical documentation is integrated into the process. Outcome Measures include: A. Percent unreconciled medications as outlined by IHI 100,000 Lives Campaign. B. Documented interventions consistent with JCAHO and IHI guidelines for patient safety. Results: NA (study not completed) Conclusions and Implications: Conclusions: NA (study not completed) Implications: A multidisciplinary and standardized approach to medication reconciliation can reduce the rate of medication errors and adverse drug events. Medication errors are one of the leading causes of injury to hospital patients. Nurses, pharmacists, and doctors are in a prime position to link a culture of medication safety with improved patient outcomes and to facilitate sustained behavior change.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMedication Reconciliation: A Multidisciplinary Approach to Patient Safety and Preventing Adverse Drug Eventsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorSwallow, Anne D.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBull, Jillen_US
dc.contributor.authorTaylor, Glenen_US
dc.author.detailsAnne D. Swallow, RN MSN, Education Coordinator, Greenwich Hospital, Staff Education, Greenwich, Connecticut, USA, email: anns@greenhosp.org; Jill Bull, RN MA MSN; Glen Taylor, PharmDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163259-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To design, implement and assess the effectiveness of a medication reconciliation process across the continuum of an inpatient stay. Specific Aim: To reduce the percent of unreconciled medications by 50% at hospital transition points utilizing a multidisciplinary team approach. Theoretical Framework: The Joint Commission for Accreditation of Hospitals (JCAHO) and the Institute for Healthcare (IHI) 100,000 Lives Campaign are both committed to reduction of patient harm from medications through hospital improvement strategies by January 2006. A considerable effort is needed to enhance the culture of patient safety through improved medication processes and reconciliation. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Outcomes research focusing on percent of unreconciled medications across the continuum of care will be utilized for this study. A multidisciplinary team will be in place to determine if a standardized medication reconciliation process is effective in reducing unreconciled medications throughout the inpatient stay. Medication reconciliation begins at admission by obtaining an accurate and complete home medication list from the patient. A process of verification, clarification, and reconciliation occurs at each transition point in the hospital stay. Computerized clinical documentation is integrated into the process. Outcome Measures include: A. Percent unreconciled medications as outlined by IHI 100,000 Lives Campaign. B. Documented interventions consistent with JCAHO and IHI guidelines for patient safety. Results: NA (study not completed) Conclusions and Implications: Conclusions: NA (study not completed) Implications: A multidisciplinary and standardized approach to medication reconciliation can reduce the rate of medication errors and adverse drug events. Medication errors are one of the leading causes of injury to hospital patients. Nurses, pharmacists, and doctors are in a prime position to link a culture of medication safety with improved patient outcomes and to facilitate sustained behavior change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:15Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:15Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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