2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163260
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Work-family policies, job satisfaction, and intent to stay among hospital nurses
Author(s):
Tang, Jane H-C.
Author Details:
Jane H-C. Tang, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Immaculata University, Department of Nursing, Immaculata, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jtang@immaculata.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe the work-family policies (WFP) currently experienced by hospital nurses, and to investigate the relationship among the WFP, job satisfaction, and intent to stay. Theoretical Framework: The adapted WFP model, including flexibility in time and place, reduced work hours and social support was used to guide the study (Glass & Riley, 1998). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a descriptive correlational study. Data were collected using a Web-based survey that included the WFP Questionnaire, the Price Job Satisfaction Scale (Price, 2001), the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (Mueller & McCloskey, 1990), the McCain's Behavioral Commitment Scale (McCloskey, 1990), and the Participant Characteristics form. The study sample consisted of 247 hospital nurses who were accessible via the Internet. Descriptive statistics, content analysis, Pearson product-moment correlations, and hierarchical regression techniques were use to analyze the data. Results: Thirteen categories emerged from the qualitative data analyses describing nurses' positive/negative experiences involved in WFP in hospital settings. The quantitative data analyses revealed that nurses whose workplace provided flexible scheduling (r=.37, .26, p< .001), leave for sick family members (r=.18, .14, p< .01, .05), and social support from supervisor (r=.43, .34, p< .001) and co-workers (r=.46, .37, p< .001) reported a higher level of job satisfaction and intent to stay, respectively. Results also showed that several WFP significantly increased nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay after controlling for the effects of moderating variables such as gender role attitude, marital status, and perceived stress in balancing work and family. The most important policies were social support from co-workers and supervisors. Conclusions and Implications: The findings are important because they established an empirical link between hospital nurses' perceptions regarding WFP and both job satisfaction and intent to stay. Demonstrating an empirical relationship between WFP and job retention will facilitate critical decision-making in the area of workforce retention and promote progress in nursing administrative practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWork-family policies, job satisfaction, and intent to stay among hospital nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTang, Jane H-C.en_US
dc.author.detailsJane H-C. Tang, PhD, RN, Assistant Professor, Immaculata University, Department of Nursing, Immaculata, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jtang@immaculata.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163260-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe the work-family policies (WFP) currently experienced by hospital nurses, and to investigate the relationship among the WFP, job satisfaction, and intent to stay. Theoretical Framework: The adapted WFP model, including flexibility in time and place, reduced work hours and social support was used to guide the study (Glass & Riley, 1998). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This was a descriptive correlational study. Data were collected using a Web-based survey that included the WFP Questionnaire, the Price Job Satisfaction Scale (Price, 2001), the McCloskey/Mueller Satisfaction Scale (Mueller & McCloskey, 1990), the McCain's Behavioral Commitment Scale (McCloskey, 1990), and the Participant Characteristics form. The study sample consisted of 247 hospital nurses who were accessible via the Internet. Descriptive statistics, content analysis, Pearson product-moment correlations, and hierarchical regression techniques were use to analyze the data. Results: Thirteen categories emerged from the qualitative data analyses describing nurses' positive/negative experiences involved in WFP in hospital settings. The quantitative data analyses revealed that nurses whose workplace provided flexible scheduling (r=.37, .26, p< .001), leave for sick family members (r=.18, .14, p< .01, .05), and social support from supervisor (r=.43, .34, p< .001) and co-workers (r=.46, .37, p< .001) reported a higher level of job satisfaction and intent to stay, respectively. Results also showed that several WFP significantly increased nurses' job satisfaction and intent to stay after controlling for the effects of moderating variables such as gender role attitude, marital status, and perceived stress in balancing work and family. The most important policies were social support from co-workers and supervisors. Conclusions and Implications: The findings are important because they established an empirical link between hospital nurses' perceptions regarding WFP and both job satisfaction and intent to stay. Demonstrating an empirical relationship between WFP and job retention will facilitate critical decision-making in the area of workforce retention and promote progress in nursing administrative practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:17Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:17Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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