2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163261
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Care Nurses' Beliefs about Communicating with Non-Speaking ICU Patients
Author(s):
Tate, Judith A.; Happ, Mary Beth; Garrett, Kathryn; Sereika, Susan; Lu, Xiaoli
Author Details:
Judith A. Tate, MSN, RN, Project Director, University of Pittsburgh, Acute and Tertiary Care, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jta100@pitt.edu; Mary Beth Happ; Kathryn Garrett, PhD; Susan Sereika; Xiaoli Lu
Abstract:
Purpose: Nonspeaking patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) represent challenges to critical care nurses who rely on multiple sources of information to assess and treat physical and psychological problems. The beliefs of critical care nurses about communication in critical care settings may have an impact on the overall ability of nurses to communicate with nonspeaking ICU patients. Theoretical Framework: The framework used is general communication theory. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Surveys were self-administered to randomly selected critical care nurses (n=20) from the Medical Intensive Care and Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Units in a large academic medical center. The Nurse Communication Survey (NCS) elicits nurses' attitudes about and factors affecting communication with nonspeaking ICU patients. Comments related to communication methods and content that nurses think the patients are attempting to communicate were obtained though open-ended questions. Survey results were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Participants were critical care nurses with an average of 8.5 (+/- 10.44) years of critical care nursing experience 4 (20%) males and 2 (10%) non-Caucasian. Seventeen (85%) were prepared at the baccalaureate level and 4 (20%) achieved CCRN certification. Most (n=18, 90%) reported that being able to communicate ones' needs is essential. Most (n=13, 65%) had learned how to communicate with nonspeaking patients through trial and error and none had formal training in communication with nonspeaking patients. Although nurses (n = 13; 65%) felt that communication methods that intubated patients use in the ICU are insufficient, most (n=14; 70%) rated their own ability to communicate good to very good. Nurses use several methods to communicate with nonspeaking patients such as Yes/No questions (n=19; 95%) and writing (n=18; 90%). However, none reported using advanced Alternative Augmentative Communication (AAC) strategies. Conclusions and Implications: Critical care nurses acknowledge the importance of communicating in nonspeaking patients' recovery. Further studies are warranted to improve nurses' ability to communicate with nonspeaking patients.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Care Nurses' Beliefs about Communicating with Non-Speaking ICU Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTate, Judith A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorHapp, Mary Bethen_US
dc.contributor.authorGarrett, Kathrynen_US
dc.contributor.authorSereika, Susanen_US
dc.contributor.authorLu, Xiaolien_US
dc.author.detailsJudith A. Tate, MSN, RN, Project Director, University of Pittsburgh, Acute and Tertiary Care, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, USA, email: jta100@pitt.edu; Mary Beth Happ; Kathryn Garrett, PhD; Susan Sereika; Xiaoli Luen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163261-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Nonspeaking patients in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU) represent challenges to critical care nurses who rely on multiple sources of information to assess and treat physical and psychological problems. The beliefs of critical care nurses about communication in critical care settings may have an impact on the overall ability of nurses to communicate with nonspeaking ICU patients. Theoretical Framework: The framework used is general communication theory. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Surveys were self-administered to randomly selected critical care nurses (n=20) from the Medical Intensive Care and Cardiothoracic Intensive Care Units in a large academic medical center. The Nurse Communication Survey (NCS) elicits nurses' attitudes about and factors affecting communication with nonspeaking ICU patients. Comments related to communication methods and content that nurses think the patients are attempting to communicate were obtained though open-ended questions. Survey results were analyzed using simple descriptive statistics. Results: Participants were critical care nurses with an average of 8.5 (+/- 10.44) years of critical care nursing experience 4 (20%) males and 2 (10%) non-Caucasian. Seventeen (85%) were prepared at the baccalaureate level and 4 (20%) achieved CCRN certification. Most (n=18, 90%) reported that being able to communicate ones' needs is essential. Most (n=13, 65%) had learned how to communicate with nonspeaking patients through trial and error and none had formal training in communication with nonspeaking patients. Although nurses (n = 13; 65%) felt that communication methods that intubated patients use in the ICU are insufficient, most (n=14; 70%) rated their own ability to communicate good to very good. Nurses use several methods to communicate with nonspeaking patients such as Yes/No questions (n=19; 95%) and writing (n=18; 90%). However, none reported using advanced Alternative Augmentative Communication (AAC) strategies. Conclusions and Implications: Critical care nurses acknowledge the importance of communicating in nonspeaking patients' recovery. Further studies are warranted to improve nurses' ability to communicate with nonspeaking patients.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:18Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:18Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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