A comparison among the sleep symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, Difficulty Sleeping, and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and diabetes severity

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163262
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
A comparison among the sleep symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, Difficulty Sleeping, and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and diabetes severity
Author(s):
Taub, Leslie-Faith Morritt
Author Details:
Leslie-Faith Morritt Taub, DNSc, Assistant Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: taublm@umdnj.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To compare the symptoms of three characteristics of sleep disorders in two groups of patients with diabetes, insulin users and non-insulin users, with the goals of describing both the self-reported magnitude of these disorders among those with diabetes and evaluating if these disorders become more frequent with the severity of diabetes. Theoretical Framework: Reynold's biopsychosocial model of sleep will be used to explain the complex interplay of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, sleep quality and the covariables of pain, age, BMI, gender and race and their effects on two groups of individuals with diabetes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using subjects enrolled in the UMNDJ TRIAD (Translational Research in Action for Diabetes) study is an opportunity to explore selected sleep disorders and how they trend in this population. Phase one: The Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index will be used to gather information on 250 subjects with diabetes grouped by insulin use, or non-use. Comparative and multivariate analysis will be performed. Phase Two: Actigraphy validated by sleep diaries will be used to compare the results of sleep duration, sleep efficiency, and frequency of awakenings in a subset of these groups. Further, self-reported sleep quality, sleepiness, fatigue, depressive symptoms, comorbidity, general health and selected demographic covariables will be compared. Results: Comparative and multivariate analysis of the two groups of subjects answering The Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index will be presented. Conclusions and Implications: Evaluating the self-report of sleep related symptomology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, difficulty sleeping, and excessive daytime sleepiness in individuals with diabetes will add to our knowledge of how these disease processes trend together and to what extent more severe insulin resistance mediates these symptoms. This is a necessary first step prior to interventions to improve these symptoms.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleA comparison among the sleep symptoms of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, Difficulty Sleeping, and Excessive Daytime Sleepiness and diabetes severityen_GB
dc.contributor.authorTaub, Leslie-Faith Morritten_US
dc.author.detailsLeslie-Faith Morritt Taub, DNSc, Assistant Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, Nursing, Newark, New Jersey, USA, email: taublm@umdnj.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163262-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To compare the symptoms of three characteristics of sleep disorders in two groups of patients with diabetes, insulin users and non-insulin users, with the goals of describing both the self-reported magnitude of these disorders among those with diabetes and evaluating if these disorders become more frequent with the severity of diabetes. Theoretical Framework: Reynold's biopsychosocial model of sleep will be used to explain the complex interplay of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, sleep quality and the covariables of pain, age, BMI, gender and race and their effects on two groups of individuals with diabetes. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using subjects enrolled in the UMNDJ TRIAD (Translational Research in Action for Diabetes) study is an opportunity to explore selected sleep disorders and how they trend in this population. Phase one: The Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index will be used to gather information on 250 subjects with diabetes grouped by insulin use, or non-use. Comparative and multivariate analysis will be performed. Phase Two: Actigraphy validated by sleep diaries will be used to compare the results of sleep duration, sleep efficiency, and frequency of awakenings in a subset of these groups. Further, self-reported sleep quality, sleepiness, fatigue, depressive symptoms, comorbidity, general health and selected demographic covariables will be compared. Results: Comparative and multivariate analysis of the two groups of subjects answering The Multivariable Apnea Prediction Index will be presented. Conclusions and Implications: Evaluating the self-report of sleep related symptomology of Obstructive Sleep Apnea Hypopnea Syndrome, difficulty sleeping, and excessive daytime sleepiness in individuals with diabetes will add to our knowledge of how these disease processes trend together and to what extent more severe insulin resistance mediates these symptoms. This is a necessary first step prior to interventions to improve these symptoms.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:19Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:19Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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