2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163266
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Behavioral Assessment Scale: A Measure of Community Living Skills
Author(s):
Ward, Frances; Elliott III, Norbert L.; Beaton, W. Patrick
Author Details:
Frances Ward, PhD, RN, APN, C, Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Nursing, Stratford, New Jersey, USA, email: wardfr@umdnj.edu; Norbert L. Elliot III, PhD; W. Patrick Beaton, PhD
Abstract:
Purpose: The Behavioral Assessment Scale (BAS), designed to measure community living skills (CLS), was developed in one arm of an interdisciplinary investigation identifying expenses in the long-term care (LTC) of residents living with AIDS. Theoretical Framework: LTC residents' community living skills (CLS) impact the number and types of nursing providers needed for safe, effective care. The BAS complements other LTC classification systems by providing a score validated to be reflective of residents' CLS. Multiple sources of validity evidence were used to ensure construct representation of the phenomenon of interest?CLS. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The 7-item BAS was developed by content experts and piloted with 121 residents in four LTC facilities, including AIDS facilities, a psychiatric facility, and a nursing home center. Trained registered nurses independently rated residents' behavior using the BAS and the Nurse Perception Scale, another measure of CLS. Researchers independently rated CLS behavior by content analysis of medical record notations. Inter-score reliability coefficients for the BAS in the total sample as well as the individual LTC samples were over .6 with probability values of .000. The evidence-based validity coefficients obtained from the total sample between the BAS and the interdisciplinary notation scores was .422 and between the BAS and the Nurse Perception Scale scores was .526, with probability values at .000 for both relationships. Statistically significant relationships were noted between individual BAS item scores to total BAS scores, indicating internal consistency of the instrument. Across all LTC samples, communication and social interaction were critical behaviors affecting nurses' ratings of residents' CLS. Conclusions and Implications: These statistical findings support the reliability and validity of the BAS across LTC settings. The BAS may be considered an acuity indicator for the allocation of resources, a tool to identify individual behaviors requiring tailored management strategies, and as a systems' tool to identify needed unit change.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Behavioral Assessment Scale: A Measure of Community Living Skillsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWard, Francesen_US
dc.contributor.authorElliott III, Norbert L.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBeaton, W. Patricken_US
dc.author.detailsFrances Ward, PhD, RN, APN, C, Professor, University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey School of Nursing, Stratford, New Jersey, USA, email: wardfr@umdnj.edu; Norbert L. Elliot III, PhD; W. Patrick Beaton, PhDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163266-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The Behavioral Assessment Scale (BAS), designed to measure community living skills (CLS), was developed in one arm of an interdisciplinary investigation identifying expenses in the long-term care (LTC) of residents living with AIDS. Theoretical Framework: LTC residents' community living skills (CLS) impact the number and types of nursing providers needed for safe, effective care. The BAS complements other LTC classification systems by providing a score validated to be reflective of residents' CLS. Multiple sources of validity evidence were used to ensure construct representation of the phenomenon of interest?CLS. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The 7-item BAS was developed by content experts and piloted with 121 residents in four LTC facilities, including AIDS facilities, a psychiatric facility, and a nursing home center. Trained registered nurses independently rated residents' behavior using the BAS and the Nurse Perception Scale, another measure of CLS. Researchers independently rated CLS behavior by content analysis of medical record notations. Inter-score reliability coefficients for the BAS in the total sample as well as the individual LTC samples were over .6 with probability values of .000. The evidence-based validity coefficients obtained from the total sample between the BAS and the interdisciplinary notation scores was .422 and between the BAS and the Nurse Perception Scale scores was .526, with probability values at .000 for both relationships. Statistically significant relationships were noted between individual BAS item scores to total BAS scores, indicating internal consistency of the instrument. Across all LTC samples, communication and social interaction were critical behaviors affecting nurses' ratings of residents' CLS. Conclusions and Implications: These statistical findings support the reliability and validity of the BAS across LTC settings. The BAS may be considered an acuity indicator for the allocation of resources, a tool to identify individual behaviors requiring tailored management strategies, and as a systems' tool to identify needed unit change.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:23Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:23Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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