Prevalence of Risk Factors in Post-Menopausal Women with and without Cardiovascular Disease

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163267
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Prevalence of Risk Factors in Post-Menopausal Women with and without Cardiovascular Disease
Author(s):
Wassef, Maureen E.; Miller, Kathleen; Howland, Lois; Crawford, Sybil
Author Details:
Maureen E. Wassef, Ph.D, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School Graduate School of Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: maureen.wassef@umassmed.edu; Kathleen Miller, Ph. D, RN; Lois Howland, MS, Dr.PH; Sybil Crawford, Ph.D
Abstract:
Purpose: Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) claims the lives of half a million women each year. CVD also impacts a variety of health outcomes contributing to an increase in Medicare costs. Of importance, is the prevention of CVD through the identification/modification of risk factors. The prevalence of traditional risk factors has been documented in the literature for the male population, but with the identification of post-menopausal women as a high risk group for developing CVD, risk factors need to be further examined in this population. It has also been suggested that unique psychosocial factors influencing the lives of these women may be associated with this disease. The purpose of this research is to examine the prevalence of both traditional and psychosocial CVD risk factors in postmenopausal women. Theoretical Framework: Lazarus and Folkman's Stress, Appraisal and Coping was utilized. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study utilized a cross-sectional design of secondary data from the Women's Health Initiative study. The sample: N=2,239 postmenopausal women (n=364 with CVD and n=1,829 without CVD). Descriptive statistics was performed with the entire sample (N=2,239) and then for each separate group (with and without CVD). A t-test or chi-square statistic was used to test for differences between the two groups. The variable categories are: demographics, health, personal, family and psycho-social history. Results: Significant differences (p< .05) between the two groups existed for: demographics (age, marital status); health history (high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes); family history; and psycho-social history (stressful life events and social support). Conclusions and Implications: Results revealed that the group with CVD differed significantly from the group without CVD. This included the presence of high cholesterol, hypertension, positive family history for CVD as well as reporting more stress and decreased social support. The results of this study identify the prevalence of both traditional and psychosocial risk factors for CVD in postmenopausal women and therefore provide the basis for intervention development for CVD prevention in this population.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePrevalence of Risk Factors in Post-Menopausal Women with and without Cardiovascular Diseaseen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWassef, Maureen E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Kathleenen_US
dc.contributor.authorHowland, Loisen_US
dc.contributor.authorCrawford, Sybilen_US
dc.author.detailsMaureen E. Wassef, Ph.D, RN, Assistant Professor, University of Massachusetts Medical School Graduate School of Nursing, Worcester, Massachusetts, USA, email: maureen.wassef@umassmed.edu; Kathleen Miller, Ph. D, RN; Lois Howland, MS, Dr.PH; Sybil Crawford, Ph.Den_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163267-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Cardiovascular Disease (CVD) claims the lives of half a million women each year. CVD also impacts a variety of health outcomes contributing to an increase in Medicare costs. Of importance, is the prevention of CVD through the identification/modification of risk factors. The prevalence of traditional risk factors has been documented in the literature for the male population, but with the identification of post-menopausal women as a high risk group for developing CVD, risk factors need to be further examined in this population. It has also been suggested that unique psychosocial factors influencing the lives of these women may be associated with this disease. The purpose of this research is to examine the prevalence of both traditional and psychosocial CVD risk factors in postmenopausal women. Theoretical Framework: Lazarus and Folkman's Stress, Appraisal and Coping was utilized. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study utilized a cross-sectional design of secondary data from the Women's Health Initiative study. The sample: N=2,239 postmenopausal women (n=364 with CVD and n=1,829 without CVD). Descriptive statistics was performed with the entire sample (N=2,239) and then for each separate group (with and without CVD). A t-test or chi-square statistic was used to test for differences between the two groups. The variable categories are: demographics, health, personal, family and psycho-social history. Results: Significant differences (p< .05) between the two groups existed for: demographics (age, marital status); health history (high cholesterol, hypertension, diabetes); family history; and psycho-social history (stressful life events and social support). Conclusions and Implications: Results revealed that the group with CVD differed significantly from the group without CVD. This included the presence of high cholesterol, hypertension, positive family history for CVD as well as reporting more stress and decreased social support. The results of this study identify the prevalence of both traditional and psychosocial risk factors for CVD in postmenopausal women and therefore provide the basis for intervention development for CVD prevention in this population.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:24Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:24Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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