2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163268
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Resolution of Urinary Incontinence (UI) Among Nursing Home (NH) Residents
Author(s):
Watson, Nancy M.; Brink, Carol A.; Zimmer, James G.; Mayer, Robert D.
Author Details:
Nancy M. Watson, PhD, RN. Director, University of Rochester Center for Clinical Research on Aging, Rochester, New York, USA, email: nancy_watson@urmc.rochester.edu; Carol A. Brink, MPH, RN, ANP, GN; James G. Zimmer, MD, DTPH; Robert D. Mayer, MD
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine ways in which residents in nursing homes who are admitted with or develop new UI have their incontinence resolved, the cost of achieving resolution and the characteristics of residents likely to have UI resolved. Theoretical Framework: The natural history of UI; evaluation and treatment recommendations of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Guideline on UI. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study tested the effectiveness of the AHCPR UI (UI) Guideline in seven nursing homes (NHs) in Upstate NY. The secondary analyses reported here pertain to 298 cases of new onset UI either on admission or during a NH stay over a 28 week follow-up period. Twenty-five subjects (8.4%) became continent. Record review and prospective interviews of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) were the sources of data. Determination of the reasons for cure was based on review by two nurse clinicians with expertise in treatment of UI in NHs. Results: Eighty-eight percent of cures were attributed to treatment of reversible causes of UI while 28% were attributed to toileting regimens and only one resident (4%) was thought cured by UI medication plus a pessary. The cost of achieving UI resolution was significantly less than not achieving resolution. UI management activities by CNAs, use of disposable products, and further medical evaluations and procedures were all less frequent for the cures (t test; p < .05). Subjects cured tended to be female, admitted from hospital/assisted living facilities with less severe UI initially. Constipation related to medication side effects, calcium supplements, lack of fluid and exercise was identified as a potentially important, unevaluated cause of reversible UI in NHs. Conclusions and Implications: Since achieving cures cost significantly less that not achieving cures, investment by NHs in improved treatment of reversible causes of UI and thorough medical evaluation may actually save cost.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Resolution of Urinary Incontinence (UI) Among Nursing Home (NH) Residentsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWatson, Nancy M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBrink, Carol A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorZimmer, James G.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMayer, Robert D.en_US
dc.author.detailsNancy M. Watson, PhD, RN. Director, University of Rochester Center for Clinical Research on Aging, Rochester, New York, USA, email: nancy_watson@urmc.rochester.edu; Carol A. Brink, MPH, RN, ANP, GN; James G. Zimmer, MD, DTPH; Robert D. Mayer, MDen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163268-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine ways in which residents in nursing homes who are admitted with or develop new UI have their incontinence resolved, the cost of achieving resolution and the characteristics of residents likely to have UI resolved. Theoretical Framework: The natural history of UI; evaluation and treatment recommendations of the Agency for Health Care Policy and Research Guideline on UI. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study tested the effectiveness of the AHCPR UI (UI) Guideline in seven nursing homes (NHs) in Upstate NY. The secondary analyses reported here pertain to 298 cases of new onset UI either on admission or during a NH stay over a 28 week follow-up period. Twenty-five subjects (8.4%) became continent. Record review and prospective interviews of certified nursing assistants (CNAs) were the sources of data. Determination of the reasons for cure was based on review by two nurse clinicians with expertise in treatment of UI in NHs. Results: Eighty-eight percent of cures were attributed to treatment of reversible causes of UI while 28% were attributed to toileting regimens and only one resident (4%) was thought cured by UI medication plus a pessary. The cost of achieving UI resolution was significantly less than not achieving resolution. UI management activities by CNAs, use of disposable products, and further medical evaluations and procedures were all less frequent for the cures (t test; p < .05). Subjects cured tended to be female, admitted from hospital/assisted living facilities with less severe UI initially. Constipation related to medication side effects, calcium supplements, lack of fluid and exercise was identified as a potentially important, unevaluated cause of reversible UI in NHs. Conclusions and Implications: Since achieving cures cost significantly less that not achieving cures, investment by NHs in improved treatment of reversible causes of UI and thorough medical evaluation may actually save cost.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:25Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:25Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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