The Predictors of Exercise Participation and Physical fitness Levels in Firefighters in Birmingham, Alabama

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163269
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Predictors of Exercise Participation and Physical fitness Levels in Firefighters in Birmingham, Alabama
Author(s):
Weaver, Michael T.; Pakapong, Yothaka; Hilyer, James
Author Details:
Dr. Michael T. Weaver, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Nursing Graduate Programs, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: weaverm@uab.edu; Dr. Yothaka Pakapong; Dr. James Hilyer
Abstract:
Purpose: Public safety jobs are physically demanding. Physical fitness is essential for public safety workers, including police officers and firefighters, to achieve job task requirements, reduce risk of work place injury, and medical cost. Exercise is a key component of physical and fitness. However, several studies reported that firefighters have low rates of exercise performance, low levels of physical fitness, and are overweight. The purposes of this study were to (a) determine which set of variables derived from the Health Promotion Model (HPM) and Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) produced the best model for predicting exercise participation, (b) determine which set of variables derived from the HPM and TRA produced the best model for predicting physical fitness levels, and (c) test the relationship between exercise participation and physical fitness levels. Theoretical Framework: The HPM and TRA served as the conceptual framework in this study. A nonexperimental correlational design was used with a convenience sample of 252 fire fighters in a metropolitan city in the southeastern United States. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data were collected using demographic, exercise behaviors, benefit and barriers of exercise, self-efficacy, situational influences, attitude, subjective norms, and intention to exercise questionnaires. The SAS program was used to perform descriptive statistics and all subsets multiple regression analysis. Results: The findings indicated that: the best model for predicting exercise participation included barriers, self-efficacy, marital status, and attitude. The best model for predicting physical fitness level included self-efficacy, situational influences, attitude, and subjective norms. There was a positive relationship between exercise participation and physical fitness levels. Conclusions and Implications: In conclusion, although subsets of HPM and TRA variables predicted exercise participation and physical fitness levels, only a small amount of variability was explained R2= 29.2% and 23.8% respectively. Recommendations for future research include: increased sample sizes; longitudinal design; use of a direct measure of exercise behavior; and exploring incorporation of other variables.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Predictors of Exercise Participation and Physical fitness Levels in Firefighters in Birmingham, Alabamaen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWeaver, Michael T.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPakapong, Yothakaen_US
dc.contributor.authorHilyer, Jamesen_US
dc.author.detailsDr. Michael T. Weaver, University of Alabama at Birmingham, Nursing Graduate Programs, Birmingham, Alabama, USA, email: weaverm@uab.edu; Dr. Yothaka Pakapong; Dr. James Hilyeren_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163269-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Public safety jobs are physically demanding. Physical fitness is essential for public safety workers, including police officers and firefighters, to achieve job task requirements, reduce risk of work place injury, and medical cost. Exercise is a key component of physical and fitness. However, several studies reported that firefighters have low rates of exercise performance, low levels of physical fitness, and are overweight. The purposes of this study were to (a) determine which set of variables derived from the Health Promotion Model (HPM) and Theory of Reasoned Action (TRA) produced the best model for predicting exercise participation, (b) determine which set of variables derived from the HPM and TRA produced the best model for predicting physical fitness levels, and (c) test the relationship between exercise participation and physical fitness levels. Theoretical Framework: The HPM and TRA served as the conceptual framework in this study. A nonexperimental correlational design was used with a convenience sample of 252 fire fighters in a metropolitan city in the southeastern United States. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Data were collected using demographic, exercise behaviors, benefit and barriers of exercise, self-efficacy, situational influences, attitude, subjective norms, and intention to exercise questionnaires. The SAS program was used to perform descriptive statistics and all subsets multiple regression analysis. Results: The findings indicated that: the best model for predicting exercise participation included barriers, self-efficacy, marital status, and attitude. The best model for predicting physical fitness level included self-efficacy, situational influences, attitude, and subjective norms. There was a positive relationship between exercise participation and physical fitness levels. Conclusions and Implications: In conclusion, although subsets of HPM and TRA variables predicted exercise participation and physical fitness levels, only a small amount of variability was explained R2= 29.2% and 23.8% respectively. Recommendations for future research include: increased sample sizes; longitudinal design; use of a direct measure of exercise behavior; and exploring incorporation of other variables.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:26Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:26Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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