10.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163272
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Moral Distress in Critical Care Nurses
Author(s):
Wiegand, Debra; Funk, Margorie
Author Details:
Debra Wiegand, RN, PhD, FAAN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, North Wales, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wiegand@son.umaryland.edu; Margorie Funk, RN, PhD, FAAN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine clinical situations that caused critical care nurses to experience moral distress. Theoretical Framework: A bioethical framework was used to guide the investigation. Moral distress is a type of moral conflict. It occurs when one knows the right thing to do, but can't pursue the right action. Little is known about moral distress in relation to nursing and even less is known about moral distress in relation to critical care nursing. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using a descriptive approach this study surveyed critical care nurses about the occurrence of moral distress. Open-ended surveys were distributed to a convenience sample of 204 critical care nurses employed at a university medical center. Critical care nurse demographic data were summarized. All survey responses were typed and Atlas computer software was used to help organize and manage the data. Data analysis used an inductive approach and thematic analysis. As similarities were noted between the themes, clusters were determined and further grouped into categories. Methodological rigor was established. Results: Forty-nine critical care nurses (24%) responded to the survey. The majority of the nurses responding to the survey had experienced moral distress and shared an exemplar of a clinical situation that caused the moral distress. The exemplars included situations related to end of life, disclosure of information, respect, safety, and work ethic. Most of the situations causing moral distress were end of life. The end of life situations centered on medical futility, organ donation, and pain management. Conclusions and Implications: Moral distress is experienced by critical care nurses. It is important that critical care nurses are knowledgeable about strategies that can be used to prevent moral distress and aid nurses who experience moral distress.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMoral Distress in Critical Care Nursesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorWiegand, Debraen_US
dc.contributor.authorFunk, Margorieen_US
dc.author.detailsDebra Wiegand, RN, PhD, FAAN, Assistant Professor, University of Maryland School of Nursing, North Wales, Pennsylvania, USA, email: wiegand@son.umaryland.edu; Margorie Funk, RN, PhD, FAANen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163272-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to determine clinical situations that caused critical care nurses to experience moral distress. Theoretical Framework: A bioethical framework was used to guide the investigation. Moral distress is a type of moral conflict. It occurs when one knows the right thing to do, but can't pursue the right action. Little is known about moral distress in relation to nursing and even less is known about moral distress in relation to critical care nursing. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Using a descriptive approach this study surveyed critical care nurses about the occurrence of moral distress. Open-ended surveys were distributed to a convenience sample of 204 critical care nurses employed at a university medical center. Critical care nurse demographic data were summarized. All survey responses were typed and Atlas computer software was used to help organize and manage the data. Data analysis used an inductive approach and thematic analysis. As similarities were noted between the themes, clusters were determined and further grouped into categories. Methodological rigor was established. Results: Forty-nine critical care nurses (24%) responded to the survey. The majority of the nurses responding to the survey had experienced moral distress and shared an exemplar of a clinical situation that caused the moral distress. The exemplars included situations related to end of life, disclosure of information, respect, safety, and work ethic. Most of the situations causing moral distress were end of life. The end of life situations centered on medical futility, organ donation, and pain management. Conclusions and Implications: Moral distress is experienced by critical care nurses. It is important that critical care nurses are knowledgeable about strategies that can be used to prevent moral distress and aid nurses who experience moral distress.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:30Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:30Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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