2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163275
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Mild, Moderate and Severe Pain in Abdominal Surgery Patients
Author(s):
Zalon, Margarete Lieb
Author Details:
Margarete Lieb Zalon, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Professor, University of Scranton, Nursing, Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zalonm1@scranton.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Pain interferes with various activities designed to promote recovery and prevent complications such as coughing and deep breathing and ambulating after surgery. Determining appropriate cut-points for a 0 to 10 numerical scale for mild, moderate and severe pain is important since specific interventions may be based upon this classification. The purpose is to use a methodology developed by Serlin et al. (1995) in a secondary analysis of data from a study of older adults' recovery from abdominal surgery to determine at what numerical level mild pain can be distinguished from moderate pain and moderate pain can be distinguished from severe pain. Theoretical Framework: This analysis is based upon the conceptualization of pain as having sensory (severity) and reactive (interference with function and quality of life) components (Cleeland, 1989). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The sample consisted of 192 patients, 102 females and 90 males, aged 60 years and older who were recruited postoperatively. Data were collected by face-to-face interview during hospitalization. Pain was measured with the Brief Pain Inventory (Daut, Cleeland & Flanery, 1983 Eight cut-point models for mild, moderate and severe pain were used to stratify the sample for average pain intensity in the previous 24 hours. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to determine the maximum between group variance for pain's interference with function. Results: The cut-points producing the highest overall effect on the BPI's interference items as indicated by Pillai's trace, Wilk's lambda and Hotelling's T2 for average pain were 1-4 for mild pain, > 4-5 for moderate pain and > 5 for severe pain. Conclusions and Implications: The results suggest a very narrow boundary between mild and severe pain interfering with function. The boundary between moderate and severe pain at 5 is lower than expected. This illustrates the need for greater vigilance in instituting pain relief measures in order to facilitate postoperative recovery.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2006
Conference Name:
18th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Description:
�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jersey
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleMild, Moderate and Severe Pain in Abdominal Surgery Patientsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorZalon, Margarete Lieben_US
dc.author.detailsMargarete Lieb Zalon, PhD, RN, APRN, BC, Professor, University of Scranton, Nursing, Scranton, Pennsylvania, USA, email: zalonm1@scranton.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163275-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Pain interferes with various activities designed to promote recovery and prevent complications such as coughing and deep breathing and ambulating after surgery. Determining appropriate cut-points for a 0 to 10 numerical scale for mild, moderate and severe pain is important since specific interventions may be based upon this classification. The purpose is to use a methodology developed by Serlin et al. (1995) in a secondary analysis of data from a study of older adults' recovery from abdominal surgery to determine at what numerical level mild pain can be distinguished from moderate pain and moderate pain can be distinguished from severe pain. Theoretical Framework: This analysis is based upon the conceptualization of pain as having sensory (severity) and reactive (interference with function and quality of life) components (Cleeland, 1989). Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The sample consisted of 192 patients, 102 females and 90 males, aged 60 years and older who were recruited postoperatively. Data were collected by face-to-face interview during hospitalization. Pain was measured with the Brief Pain Inventory (Daut, Cleeland & Flanery, 1983 Eight cut-point models for mild, moderate and severe pain were used to stratify the sample for average pain intensity in the previous 24 hours. Multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) was performed to determine the maximum between group variance for pain's interference with function. Results: The cut-points producing the highest overall effect on the BPI's interference items as indicated by Pillai's trace, Wilk's lambda and Hotelling's T2 for average pain were 1-4 for mild pain, > 4-5 for moderate pain and > 5 for severe pain. Conclusions and Implications: The results suggest a very narrow boundary between mild and severe pain interfering with function. The boundary between moderate and severe pain at 5 is lower than expected. This illustrates the need for greater vigilance in instituting pain relief measures in order to facilitate postoperative recovery.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:33Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:33Z-
dc.conference.date2006en_US
dc.conference.name18th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationCherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description�New Momentum for Nursing Research: Multidisciplinary Alliances�, held on April 20th -22nd at the Hilton in Cherry Hill, New Jerseyen_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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