Physiological measures of cerebral perfusion predict cognitive function in heart failure

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163280
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Physiological measures of cerebral perfusion predict cognitive function in heart failure
Author(s):
Athilingam, Ponrathi R.
Author Details:
Ponrathi R. Athilingam, MS, RN, ACNP, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: ponrathi_athilingam@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate a simple screening tool to measure cognitive deficit in Heart Failure (HF) by examining the relationships among three physiological measures of cerebral perfusion and two tests of cognitive function. Theoretical Framework: Cerebral hypoperfusion due to low Cardiac output has been established as the etiology for cognitive deficit. However, physiologic measures of cerebral perfusion have not been correlated with screening measures of cognitive function. Cognitive deficit in HF is subtle and can be difficult to measure in the clinical setting due to the lack of a simple cognitive measurement tool appropriate for use with HF patients. The Montreal cognitive Assessment is a simple tool that has recently been approved by The Canadian Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Dementia as a screening for mild cognitive impairment, a precursor for Alzheimer's disease. The tests on MoCA are specially targeted to pick up subtle cognitive changes in memory than the Mini Mental Status Examination. Therefore, this study attempts to evaluate the MoCA as a cognitive measurement tool that is appropriate for use in persons with HF. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design will be used to collect data from 90 participants who have clinical diagnosis of HF. The physiological measures of cerebral perfusion include the cerebral perfusion pressure measured by transcranial doppler and cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography. Multiple regression equations will be calculated to determine the amount of variance accounted for by each independent variable, controlling for all covariates on the dependent variables. Results: study not completed. Conclusions and Implications: The results from this study has the potential to guide health care providers in identifying subtle cognitive changes in persons with HF at an early stage and to formulate feasible strategies to minimize low cardiac output state before major cognitive impairment becomes evident.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePhysiological measures of cerebral perfusion predict cognitive function in heart failureen_GB
dc.contributor.authorAthilingam, Ponrathi R.en_US
dc.author.detailsPonrathi R. Athilingam, MS, RN, ACNP, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: ponrathi_athilingam@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163280-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this study is to evaluate a simple screening tool to measure cognitive deficit in Heart Failure (HF) by examining the relationships among three physiological measures of cerebral perfusion and two tests of cognitive function. Theoretical Framework: Cerebral hypoperfusion due to low Cardiac output has been established as the etiology for cognitive deficit. However, physiologic measures of cerebral perfusion have not been correlated with screening measures of cognitive function. Cognitive deficit in HF is subtle and can be difficult to measure in the clinical setting due to the lack of a simple cognitive measurement tool appropriate for use with HF patients. The Montreal cognitive Assessment is a simple tool that has recently been approved by The Canadian Guidelines for the Diagnosis and Management of Dementia as a screening for mild cognitive impairment, a precursor for Alzheimer's disease. The tests on MoCA are specially targeted to pick up subtle cognitive changes in memory than the Mini Mental Status Examination. Therefore, this study attempts to evaluate the MoCA as a cognitive measurement tool that is appropriate for use in persons with HF. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A cross-sectional, descriptive, correlational design will be used to collect data from 90 participants who have clinical diagnosis of HF. The physiological measures of cerebral perfusion include the cerebral perfusion pressure measured by transcranial doppler and cardiac output measured by impedance cardiography. Multiple regression equations will be calculated to determine the amount of variance accounted for by each independent variable, controlling for all covariates on the dependent variables. Results: study not completed. Conclusions and Implications: The results from this study has the potential to guide health care providers in identifying subtle cognitive changes in persons with HF at an early stage and to formulate feasible strategies to minimize low cardiac output state before major cognitive impairment becomes evident.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:38Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:38Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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