Understanding Beliefs, Knowledge & Practices of Vietnamese Mothers Related to Feeding Infants and Young Children

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163281
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Understanding Beliefs, Knowledge & Practices of Vietnamese Mothers Related to Feeding Infants and Young Children
Author(s):
Babington, Lynn
Author Details:
Lynn Babington, PhD, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: l.babington@neu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this research was to understand the feeding practices, knowledge and nutritional beliefs of Vietnamese mothers with young children who are recent immigrants to the US. Theoretical Framework: Background: Obesity in children has reached epidemic proportions in the United States where an estimated 15% of children are obese. Perhaps even more troubling is the finding that childhood obesity is correlated strongly with obesity in adulthood and is increasingly observed in younger age groups and immigrant children. Parents have a major influence on the weight of children and are therefore an obvious initial focus for education and support on healthy feeding practices. Nurses are in a unique position to take the lead in helping parents develop healthy child feeding practices. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Methods: This exploratory, descriptive study used a focus group design to provide qualitative data. Twelve Vietnamese mothers of children under the age of 5 participated in a one-hour focus group discussion (in Vietnamese) facilitated by a Vietnamese nutritionist and the PI. Results: The study resulted in a description of how Vietnamese mothers feed their children and on their beliefs about the health implications of child feeding practices. Conclusion and Implications: Findings from this study help to increase understanding of feeding practices of Vietnamese children whose mothers are recent immigrants. This knowledge can be used by nurses to develop culturally appropriate interventions for immigrants from Vietnam aimed at preventing childhood obesity. Interventions that consider the effects of acculturation will be more effective when targeted to parents of young children than interventions focused on treatment of obesity in later years.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleUnderstanding Beliefs, Knowledge & Practices of Vietnamese Mothers Related to Feeding Infants and Young Childrenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBabington, Lynnen_US
dc.author.detailsLynn Babington, PhD, Northeastern University, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: l.babington@neu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163281-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this research was to understand the feeding practices, knowledge and nutritional beliefs of Vietnamese mothers with young children who are recent immigrants to the US. Theoretical Framework: Background: Obesity in children has reached epidemic proportions in the United States where an estimated 15% of children are obese. Perhaps even more troubling is the finding that childhood obesity is correlated strongly with obesity in adulthood and is increasingly observed in younger age groups and immigrant children. Parents have a major influence on the weight of children and are therefore an obvious initial focus for education and support on healthy feeding practices. Nurses are in a unique position to take the lead in helping parents develop healthy child feeding practices. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Methods: This exploratory, descriptive study used a focus group design to provide qualitative data. Twelve Vietnamese mothers of children under the age of 5 participated in a one-hour focus group discussion (in Vietnamese) facilitated by a Vietnamese nutritionist and the PI. Results: The study resulted in a description of how Vietnamese mothers feed their children and on their beliefs about the health implications of child feeding practices. Conclusion and Implications: Findings from this study help to increase understanding of feeding practices of Vietnamese children whose mothers are recent immigrants. This knowledge can be used by nurses to develop culturally appropriate interventions for immigrants from Vietnam aimed at preventing childhood obesity. Interventions that consider the effects of acculturation will be more effective when targeted to parents of young children than interventions focused on treatment of obesity in later years.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:39Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:39Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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