2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163282
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Family Caregivers in Uncertain Times: An Exploration of Three Death Trajectories
Author(s):
Bachman, Megan C.; Penrod, Janice; Hupcey, Judith E.
Author Details:
Megan C. Bachman, RN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mcb286@psu.edu; Janice Penrod, PhD, RN; Judith E. Hupcey, EdD, CRNP
Abstract:
Purpose: To explore strategies used by informal caregivers to manage times of uncertainty across three distinct death trajectories. Background: Trajectories of chronic diseases leading to the phase typically acknowledged as the end of life change the everyday way of life for the extended patient system. As care providers, informal family caregivers face changing demands across long-term trajectories as they support their loved ones through deteriorating health toward the end of life. Despite their role as co-providers of care, informal caregivers are not targeted recipients of holistic end-of-life care. Since these caregivers report pronounced experiences of uncertainty peaked by transitions in patterned death trajectories, a significant opportunity exists to better support family caregivers through well-focused, carefully timed nursing interventions. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative inquiry, grounded theory methods. Participants: 17 active or former family caregivers involved in: expected death trajectory (ALS, 5 participants); unexpected death trajectory (heart failure, 6 participants); and mixed death trajectory (Lung cancer, 6 participants). Setting: Caregivers provided supportive care through the terminal phase, primarily at home. Data Collection: Data were collected as part of a larger grounded theory study on end-of-life care giving. Interviews were conducted in caregivers' homes. Analytic Approach: Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using constant comparative methods. Results: Experiences of both situational and existential uncertainty were prominently reported by all caregivers. Preliminary analysis revealed discrete strategies employed by caregivers to live with uncertainty, including: following a routine, seeking support (through persons and faith), finding respite, and self-education. Conclusions and Implications: The data clearly show that uncertainty is a problematic experience that prompts responsive strategies by family caregivers. Further research is needed to explore the feasibility of assessing caregiver uncertainty and intervening across the care giving trajectory, using phase-specific strategies for dealing with uncertainty in order to prevent unnecessary suffering.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleFamily Caregivers in Uncertain Times: An Exploration of Three Death Trajectoriesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBachman, Megan C.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPenrod, Janiceen_US
dc.contributor.authorHupcey, Judith E.en_US
dc.author.detailsMegan C. Bachman, RN, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mcb286@psu.edu; Janice Penrod, PhD, RN; Judith E. Hupcey, EdD, CRNPen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163282-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To explore strategies used by informal caregivers to manage times of uncertainty across three distinct death trajectories. Background: Trajectories of chronic diseases leading to the phase typically acknowledged as the end of life change the everyday way of life for the extended patient system. As care providers, informal family caregivers face changing demands across long-term trajectories as they support their loved ones through deteriorating health toward the end of life. Despite their role as co-providers of care, informal caregivers are not targeted recipients of holistic end-of-life care. Since these caregivers report pronounced experiences of uncertainty peaked by transitions in patterned death trajectories, a significant opportunity exists to better support family caregivers through well-focused, carefully timed nursing interventions. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): Design: Qualitative inquiry, grounded theory methods. Participants: 17 active or former family caregivers involved in: expected death trajectory (ALS, 5 participants); unexpected death trajectory (heart failure, 6 participants); and mixed death trajectory (Lung cancer, 6 participants). Setting: Caregivers provided supportive care through the terminal phase, primarily at home. Data Collection: Data were collected as part of a larger grounded theory study on end-of-life care giving. Interviews were conducted in caregivers' homes. Analytic Approach: Verbatim transcripts were analyzed using constant comparative methods. Results: Experiences of both situational and existential uncertainty were prominently reported by all caregivers. Preliminary analysis revealed discrete strategies employed by caregivers to live with uncertainty, including: following a routine, seeking support (through persons and faith), finding respite, and self-education. Conclusions and Implications: The data clearly show that uncertainty is a problematic experience that prompts responsive strategies by family caregivers. Further research is needed to explore the feasibility of assessing caregiver uncertainty and intervening across the care giving trajectory, using phase-specific strategies for dealing with uncertainty in order to prevent unnecessary suffering.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:40Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:40Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
All Items in this repository are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.