"Background Noise": A Metaphor of Patient's Perspectives on Symptoms and Everyday Life Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163283
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
"Background Noise": A Metaphor of Patient's Perspectives on Symptoms and Everyday Life Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathy
Author(s):
Bakitas, Marie A.
Author Details:
Marie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc, FAAN, Yale University, West Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common, but understudied dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to explore patients' perceptions of symptom and everyday life effects. Background: CIPN has been assessed and reported primarily through neurophysiologic tests, toxicity grading, and self-report surveys assessing symptom severity. A comprehensive description from the patient's perspective is lacking. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This was an exploratory, qualitative descriptive study. Subjects completed in-depth interviews and 2 self-report questionnaires. Verbatim transcribed interviews were coded and analyzed using Atlas.ti software. A progressive process of classifying, comparing, grouping, and refining data resulted in symptom descriptions and an over-arching metaphor and themes. Results: Constant comparative analysis resulted in conceptual redundancy after 28 interviews. The sample had a mean age of 59 years (+/-9.6), were primarily female (71%), married (82%), and had a diagnosis of breast cancer (50%). Median time since diagnosis was 34 months. Content analysis yielded a rich, thick description of CIPN symptoms and effects on functional ability. The CIPN symptom experience was described by an over-arching metaphor, Background Noise in Everyday life with Cancer, with 4 themes: a) Becoming Aware; b) Learning New Lyrics; c) Functional, Emotional, and Social/Role Cacophony; and d) Learning to Live with It. Conclusions and Implications: The study findings demonstrate previously undocumented physical limitations, emotional distress, and social role impairments that were often invisible to clinicians and were not assessed by measures used in clinical trials. There was not always a direct relationship between the intensity of the symptom experience and the level of symptom distress. The findings demonstrate the need to expand CIPN assessment and symptom descriptions to include physical, emotional, and social role functional effects. Additional research is also needed to explore all of the factors that affect patients' appraisals of the symptom experience and the coping strategies of chronic, invisible treatment side effects.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.title"Background Noise": A Metaphor of Patient's Perspectives on Symptoms and Everyday Life Effects of Chemotherapy-Induced Peripheral Neuropathyen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBakitas, Marie A.en_US
dc.author.detailsMarie A. Bakitas, ARNP, DNSc, FAAN, Yale University, West Lebanon, New Hampshire, USA, email: marie.bakitas@dartmouth.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163283-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Chemotherapy-induced peripheral neuropathy (CIPN) is a common, but understudied dose-limiting toxicity of chemotherapy. The purpose of this study was to explore patients' perceptions of symptom and everyday life effects. Background: CIPN has been assessed and reported primarily through neurophysiologic tests, toxicity grading, and self-report surveys assessing symptom severity. A comprehensive description from the patient's perspective is lacking. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): This was an exploratory, qualitative descriptive study. Subjects completed in-depth interviews and 2 self-report questionnaires. Verbatim transcribed interviews were coded and analyzed using Atlas.ti software. A progressive process of classifying, comparing, grouping, and refining data resulted in symptom descriptions and an over-arching metaphor and themes. Results: Constant comparative analysis resulted in conceptual redundancy after 28 interviews. The sample had a mean age of 59 years (+/-9.6), were primarily female (71%), married (82%), and had a diagnosis of breast cancer (50%). Median time since diagnosis was 34 months. Content analysis yielded a rich, thick description of CIPN symptoms and effects on functional ability. The CIPN symptom experience was described by an over-arching metaphor, Background Noise in Everyday life with Cancer, with 4 themes: a) Becoming Aware; b) Learning New Lyrics; c) Functional, Emotional, and Social/Role Cacophony; and d) Learning to Live with It. Conclusions and Implications: The study findings demonstrate previously undocumented physical limitations, emotional distress, and social role impairments that were often invisible to clinicians and were not assessed by measures used in clinical trials. There was not always a direct relationship between the intensity of the symptom experience and the level of symptom distress. The findings demonstrate the need to expand CIPN assessment and symptom descriptions to include physical, emotional, and social role functional effects. Additional research is also needed to explore all of the factors that affect patients' appraisals of the symptom experience and the coping strategies of chronic, invisible treatment side effects.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:41Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:41Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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