Risk Index Predictors of High School Academic Performance in Adolescents Born Preterm

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163284
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Risk Index Predictors of High School Academic Performance in Adolescents Born Preterm
Author(s):
Barcelos, Suzy; Sullivan, Mary C.
Author Details:
Suzy Barcelos, MA, Women & Infants Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: sbarcelos@wihri.org; Mary C. Sullivan, PhD, University of Rhode Island
Abstract:
Purpose: Children born prematurely linger behind full-term peers in elementary to middle school and require more remedial services. Little is known about their high school academic performance and the relative contribution of medical and environmental risk factors. Our purpose was to examine the independent and cumulative effects of medical and environmental risk indexes on academic performance of premature children at age 17. Theoretical Framework: Using the transactional model, academic performance reflects the interaction between the developing preterm adolescent and the dynamic environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, 5-group, longitudinal design was used with full-term (n=44) and preterm infants [healthy (n=28), medical (n=46), neurological (n=27), small for gestational age (n=38)]. School data on attendance, tardiness, suspensions/detentions, specialized services/academic resources, and type of school curriculum were collected. Grade point average (GPA) was calculated from four semesters of grades in math, language, social studies, and science. Kaufman-Brief Intelligence Test measured IQ. A cumulative medical risk index included neonatal, medical, and neurological status variables from birth to age 12. A cumulative environmental risk index included family demographic, support, resource, life and psychological distress variables. Multiple linear regression models tested predictors of IQ, and cumulative medical and environmental risk indexes on GPA. Results: Higher medical or environmental risk was associated with lower GPA. Students who had severe perinatal morbidity, were home schooled, or dropped out (n=15) were excluded. With these exceptions, there were no differences between groups for IQ or GPA. Preterm adolescents had greater cumulative medical risk. Healthy preterm adolescents had the most environmental risk. With IQ covaried, medical and environmental risks independently predicted 27% variance in grades at age 17.Conclusions and Implications: Preterm adolescent school performance is commensurate to full-term peers. Risk indexes represent the processes by which cumulative medical and environmental factors across time affect academic performance at age 17. They act as contextual identifiers, suggesting development of preventative interventions.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleRisk Index Predictors of High School Academic Performance in Adolescents Born Pretermen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBarcelos, Suzyen_US
dc.contributor.authorSullivan, Mary C.en_US
dc.author.detailsSuzy Barcelos, MA, Women & Infants Hospital, Providence, Rhode Island, USA, email: sbarcelos@wihri.org; Mary C. Sullivan, PhD, University of Rhode Islanden_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163284-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Children born prematurely linger behind full-term peers in elementary to middle school and require more remedial services. Little is known about their high school academic performance and the relative contribution of medical and environmental risk factors. Our purpose was to examine the independent and cumulative effects of medical and environmental risk indexes on academic performance of premature children at age 17. Theoretical Framework: Using the transactional model, academic performance reflects the interaction between the developing preterm adolescent and the dynamic environment. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A prospective, 5-group, longitudinal design was used with full-term (n=44) and preterm infants [healthy (n=28), medical (n=46), neurological (n=27), small for gestational age (n=38)]. School data on attendance, tardiness, suspensions/detentions, specialized services/academic resources, and type of school curriculum were collected. Grade point average (GPA) was calculated from four semesters of grades in math, language, social studies, and science. Kaufman-Brief Intelligence Test measured IQ. A cumulative medical risk index included neonatal, medical, and neurological status variables from birth to age 12. A cumulative environmental risk index included family demographic, support, resource, life and psychological distress variables. Multiple linear regression models tested predictors of IQ, and cumulative medical and environmental risk indexes on GPA. Results: Higher medical or environmental risk was associated with lower GPA. Students who had severe perinatal morbidity, were home schooled, or dropped out (n=15) were excluded. With these exceptions, there were no differences between groups for IQ or GPA. Preterm adolescents had greater cumulative medical risk. Healthy preterm adolescents had the most environmental risk. With IQ covaried, medical and environmental risks independently predicted 27% variance in grades at age 17.Conclusions and Implications: Preterm adolescent school performance is commensurate to full-term peers. Risk indexes represent the processes by which cumulative medical and environmental factors across time affect academic performance at age 17. They act as contextual identifiers, suggesting development of preventative interventions.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:42Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:42Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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