2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163288
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Public and Professional Views on End-of-Life Care for Trauma Victims
Author(s):
Bennett Jacobs, Barbara; Burns, Karyl
Author Details:
Barbara Bennett Jacobs, RN, MPH, PHD, CHPN, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: homejacobs@aol.com; Karyl Burns RN, PHD, Hartford Hospital
Abstract:
Purpose: Compare/Contrast public and trauma professionals' views of caring for dying trauma victims. Use results to inform Trauma/Best Practice Model for end-of-life care. Theoretical Framework: The literature has not significantly addressed dying from trauma. Sudden events, critical injuries, family guilt, unfamiliarity with patients' values result in unique end-of-life scenarios. To clarify controversy (family presence resuscitation room, medical futility, PVS) both the public and professionals were surveyed. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Random-digit dialing was used to contact persons (> 18) years in the US. Forty-three previously-piloted questions were asked. The same survey was mailed to US Level I and II trauma center directors, Society of Trauma Nurses' membership, EMS personnel in New Orleans, Chicago, Hartford. Analysis used two-sided Z tests (p = < 0.05 statistically significant). Public responses weighted by US Census data. Results: Sample of Public Results (N=1006) Followed by Professional Results (N=773) ("Do not know" not included) If your loved one needed resuscitation would you prefer to be in treatment or waiting room? Treatment - 52% Waiting - 41%; Treatment - 63% Waiting - 30%; < 0.001. When doctors think there is no hope for recovery, should life sustaining treatment be stopped or continued? Stopped - 73% Continued - 21%; Stopped - 94% Continued - 3% < 0.001. Should patients have the right to demand care doctors think will not benefit? Yes - 72.4% No - 20.2%; Yes - 44.3% No - 44.8% < 0.001. Are you an organ donor? Yes - 51% No - 49.1%; Yes - 78.9% No - 16.5% < 0.001. Do you have a living will? Yes - 36% No - 63%; Yes - 40.4% No - 59.4% < .05. If you were in a PVS would you prefer to be kept alive or die? Alive - 11% Die - 84.4%; Alive - 3.2% Die - 94.2% < 0.001. Conclusions and Implications: Trauma claims (> 140,000) lives/year. End-of-life care is predicated on knowing the values and preferences of those who are dying. Views of the public and professionals contribute to validity of a best practice model that respects articulated values.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titlePublic and Professional Views on End-of-Life Care for Trauma Victimsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBennett Jacobs, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorBurns, Karylen_US
dc.author.detailsBarbara Bennett Jacobs, RN, MPH, PHD, CHPN, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: homejacobs@aol.com; Karyl Burns RN, PHD, Hartford Hospitalen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163288-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Compare/Contrast public and trauma professionals' views of caring for dying trauma victims. Use results to inform Trauma/Best Practice Model for end-of-life care. Theoretical Framework: The literature has not significantly addressed dying from trauma. Sudden events, critical injuries, family guilt, unfamiliarity with patients' values result in unique end-of-life scenarios. To clarify controversy (family presence resuscitation room, medical futility, PVS) both the public and professionals were surveyed. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Random-digit dialing was used to contact persons (> 18) years in the US. Forty-three previously-piloted questions were asked. The same survey was mailed to US Level I and II trauma center directors, Society of Trauma Nurses' membership, EMS personnel in New Orleans, Chicago, Hartford. Analysis used two-sided Z tests (p = < 0.05 statistically significant). Public responses weighted by US Census data. Results: Sample of Public Results (N=1006) Followed by Professional Results (N=773) ("Do not know" not included) If your loved one needed resuscitation would you prefer to be in treatment or waiting room? Treatment - 52% Waiting - 41%; Treatment - 63% Waiting - 30%; < 0.001. When doctors think there is no hope for recovery, should life sustaining treatment be stopped or continued? Stopped - 73% Continued - 21%; Stopped - 94% Continued - 3% < 0.001. Should patients have the right to demand care doctors think will not benefit? Yes - 72.4% No - 20.2%; Yes - 44.3% No - 44.8% < 0.001. Are you an organ donor? Yes - 51% No - 49.1%; Yes - 78.9% No - 16.5% < 0.001. Do you have a living will? Yes - 36% No - 63%; Yes - 40.4% No - 59.4% < .05. If you were in a PVS would you prefer to be kept alive or die? Alive - 11% Die - 84.4%; Alive - 3.2% Die - 94.2% < 0.001. Conclusions and Implications: Trauma claims (> 140,000) lives/year. End-of-life care is predicated on knowing the values and preferences of those who are dying. Views of the public and professionals contribute to validity of a best practice model that respects articulated values.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:46Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:46Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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