2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163294
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Nurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Pain
Author(s):
Buckley, Margaret M.
Author Details:
Margaret M. Buckley, MSN, APRN, BC, Cambridge Health Alliance, Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, email: mmbuckley@challiance.org
Abstract:
Purpose: Identify prevalence of pain; determine associations between educational preparation, experience, perceived ability to manage pain and test results; identify implications for practice. Background: Nurses' beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge to manage pain may prevent optimal pain management. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study was conducted to determine the prevalence of pain, measure the nurses' perception of their preparedness to manage pain, and to establish baseline data of nurses' knowledge and attitudes related to pain using a modified McCaffery and Ferrell 1997 test. IRB approval was sought and obtained. Convenience sample 700 nurses; participation voluntary, responses anonymous, data collected, analyzed, reported in aggregate. The study was available by utilizing a survey monkey format; seven demographic questions, 20 test questions, three open response questions. Results: 220 nurses participated (31.4% response rate), 81% of nurses reported their patients experienced pain on a daily basis, 89% of nurses indicated they felt at least 50% prepared to effectively manage their patients' pain. The McCaffery and Ferrell test revealed mean score 13.2 +/- 2.99 (66/100%); seven questions specific to pharmacology were analyzed separately for a mean score 3.6 +/- 1.2 (51/100%). Regression analysis was performed to determine if scores were correlated to years of nursing experience, educational preparation, or perceived preparedness to manage pain. Advanced educational preparation was statistically significant for higher test scores (p = 0.067); years of nursing experience and perceived preparedness to manage pain were negatively correlated but not statistically significant. Conclusions and Implications: Pain is a prevalent problem for this patient population. Nurses' ability to recognize the adverse effects of unrelieved pain and their willingness to reflect on the impact their personal beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge limitations may contribute to ineffective pain management in their patient populations may begin to bridge the theory - practice gap and allow individual nurses to utilize evidence based best pain management practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNurses' Knowledge and Attitudes Survey Regarding Painen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBuckley, Margaret M.en_US
dc.author.detailsMargaret M. Buckley, MSN, APRN, BC, Cambridge Health Alliance, Somerville, Massachusetts, USA, email: mmbuckley@challiance.orgen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163294-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Identify prevalence of pain; determine associations between educational preparation, experience, perceived ability to manage pain and test results; identify implications for practice. Background: Nurses' beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge to manage pain may prevent optimal pain management. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A quantitative, non-experimental, descriptive study was conducted to determine the prevalence of pain, measure the nurses' perception of their preparedness to manage pain, and to establish baseline data of nurses' knowledge and attitudes related to pain using a modified McCaffery and Ferrell 1997 test. IRB approval was sought and obtained. Convenience sample 700 nurses; participation voluntary, responses anonymous, data collected, analyzed, reported in aggregate. The study was available by utilizing a survey monkey format; seven demographic questions, 20 test questions, three open response questions. Results: 220 nurses participated (31.4% response rate), 81% of nurses reported their patients experienced pain on a daily basis, 89% of nurses indicated they felt at least 50% prepared to effectively manage their patients' pain. The McCaffery and Ferrell test revealed mean score 13.2 +/- 2.99 (66/100%); seven questions specific to pharmacology were analyzed separately for a mean score 3.6 +/- 1.2 (51/100%). Regression analysis was performed to determine if scores were correlated to years of nursing experience, educational preparation, or perceived preparedness to manage pain. Advanced educational preparation was statistically significant for higher test scores (p = 0.067); years of nursing experience and perceived preparedness to manage pain were negatively correlated but not statistically significant. Conclusions and Implications: Pain is a prevalent problem for this patient population. Nurses' ability to recognize the adverse effects of unrelieved pain and their willingness to reflect on the impact their personal beliefs, attitudes, and knowledge limitations may contribute to ineffective pain management in their patient populations may begin to bridge the theory - practice gap and allow individual nurses to utilize evidence based best pain management practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:53Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:53Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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