Assessment of Health Related Quality of Life (QOL) in Clinical Practice of Oncology Nurses and Physicians

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163295
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Assessment of Health Related Quality of Life (QOL) in Clinical Practice of Oncology Nurses and Physicians
Author(s):
Budin, Wendy C.
Author Details:
Wendy C. Budin, PhD, RN, BC, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey, USA, email: budinwen@shu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To determine the use of QOL assessment of oncology nurses and physicians in their practices, their knowledge of specific QOL instruments, and any barriers they face to using these tools. Theoretical Framework: Quality of life (QOL) is recognized as an important dimension of overall health status. Research suggests that routine use of QOL instruments as part of clinical practice has the potential to improve patient care outcomes. The multidimensionality, complexity, and individuality of how QOL is perceived by each patient warrant the use of evidenced-based assessment tools. Although QOL assessment is now widely accepted in cancer clinical trials, it is not clear if such recognition and use has taken place in the clinical practice setting. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A survey designed to assess the use of QOL assessment in cancer care was mailed to 790 oncology nurses and 264 oncologists in clinical practice in New Jersey. Three hundred seventeen surveys were completed and returned by nurses (40%) and 163 by oncologists (50%). Descriptive and comparative statistics were used. Results: Although 88.6% of the oncologists responded that they ask patients about overall well-being or QOL at every visit, only 12.4% use standardized tools. For nurses 64% responded that they ask their patients about QOL at every visit however only 23% used standardized tools. Physical symptoms were assessed significantly more often than psychosocial symptoms (p < .001) by both nurses and oncologists. Nurses and oncologists rated the usefulness of various standardized QOL instruments as moderately useful. The greatest barrier that both nurses and oncologists faced using tools for assessing QOL was identifying standardized tools that are valid and reliable (64% -nurses; 74% -oncologists). Conclusions and Implications: Educating nurses and physicians working with oncology patients about the benefits of standardized QOL assessment tools and identifying tools best suited to their practice would be important steps in improving QOL assessment in clinical practice.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAssessment of Health Related Quality of Life (QOL) in Clinical Practice of Oncology Nurses and Physiciansen_GB
dc.contributor.authorBudin, Wendy C.en_US
dc.author.detailsWendy C. Budin, PhD, RN, BC, Seton Hall University, South Orange, New Jersey, USA, email: budinwen@shu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163295-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To determine the use of QOL assessment of oncology nurses and physicians in their practices, their knowledge of specific QOL instruments, and any barriers they face to using these tools. Theoretical Framework: Quality of life (QOL) is recognized as an important dimension of overall health status. Research suggests that routine use of QOL instruments as part of clinical practice has the potential to improve patient care outcomes. The multidimensionality, complexity, and individuality of how QOL is perceived by each patient warrant the use of evidenced-based assessment tools. Although QOL assessment is now widely accepted in cancer clinical trials, it is not clear if such recognition and use has taken place in the clinical practice setting. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A survey designed to assess the use of QOL assessment in cancer care was mailed to 790 oncology nurses and 264 oncologists in clinical practice in New Jersey. Three hundred seventeen surveys were completed and returned by nurses (40%) and 163 by oncologists (50%). Descriptive and comparative statistics were used. Results: Although 88.6% of the oncologists responded that they ask patients about overall well-being or QOL at every visit, only 12.4% use standardized tools. For nurses 64% responded that they ask their patients about QOL at every visit however only 23% used standardized tools. Physical symptoms were assessed significantly more often than psychosocial symptoms (p < .001) by both nurses and oncologists. Nurses and oncologists rated the usefulness of various standardized QOL instruments as moderately useful. The greatest barrier that both nurses and oncologists faced using tools for assessing QOL was identifying standardized tools that are valid and reliable (64% -nurses; 74% -oncologists). Conclusions and Implications: Educating nurses and physicians working with oncology patients about the benefits of standardized QOL assessment tools and identifying tools best suited to their practice would be important steps in improving QOL assessment in clinical practice.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:54Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:54Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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