Critical Review of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in the Elderly with Implications for Research and Practice

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163297
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Critical Review of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in the Elderly with Implications for Research and Practice
Author(s):
Calvin, Connie L.
Author Details:
Connie L. Calvin, CRNA, MS, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: c.calvin@neu.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The aim of this review is to contribute to the knowledge of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in the elderly and to provide a foundation for investigating the influence of postoperative cognitive interventions on improving cognitive processing and quality of life. Background: It has been acknowledged since the mid 1950s that some patients emerge from anesthesia with impairment in cognitive function that was not present preoperatively. POCD is characterized by impairment of memory, concentration, language comprehension, and social integration. Previous studies suggest that symptoms of POCD may persist for months or even years and is associated with poor patient outcomes, increased mortality, and longer lengths of hospital stay. Approach: Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database from 1970 through present time using search terms related to postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Of the 544 citations found, 51 research reports were identified as being directly related to the topic. Each article was reviewed, and data were extracted from tables or text or extrapolated from figures. The Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing and Cognitive Processing provides the framework to synthesize investigation of studies to date. Major Points & Rationale: Despite improvements in anesthesia practice over the past 30 years, the incidence of POCD remains as high as 56%. POCD in older adults is of critical importance in relation to independent living, need for care, personal and economic cost, and quality of life. The majority of studies to date examine risk factors, prevalence, and complications associated with POCD. There is a lack of effective intervention strategies being developed to promote improved cognitive processing. Conclusions: Cognitive processing is a distinctive and critical human experience. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common and potentially devastating complication. Study of potential therapeutic interventions in the postoperative period is essential to promote independence for the elderly patient and improve quality of life.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleCritical Review of Postoperative Cognitive Dysfunction in the Elderly with Implications for Research and Practiceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCalvin, Connie L.en_US
dc.author.detailsConnie L. Calvin, CRNA, MS, Boston College, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts, USA, email: c.calvin@neu.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163297-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The aim of this review is to contribute to the knowledge of postoperative cognitive dysfunction (POCD) in the elderly and to provide a foundation for investigating the influence of postoperative cognitive interventions on improving cognitive processing and quality of life. Background: It has been acknowledged since the mid 1950s that some patients emerge from anesthesia with impairment in cognitive function that was not present preoperatively. POCD is characterized by impairment of memory, concentration, language comprehension, and social integration. Previous studies suggest that symptoms of POCD may persist for months or even years and is associated with poor patient outcomes, increased mortality, and longer lengths of hospital stay. Approach: Studies were identified by searching the PubMed database from 1970 through present time using search terms related to postoperative cognitive dysfunction. Of the 544 citations found, 51 research reports were identified as being directly related to the topic. Each article was reviewed, and data were extracted from tables or text or extrapolated from figures. The Roy Adaptation Model of Nursing and Cognitive Processing provides the framework to synthesize investigation of studies to date. Major Points & Rationale: Despite improvements in anesthesia practice over the past 30 years, the incidence of POCD remains as high as 56%. POCD in older adults is of critical importance in relation to independent living, need for care, personal and economic cost, and quality of life. The majority of studies to date examine risk factors, prevalence, and complications associated with POCD. There is a lack of effective intervention strategies being developed to promote improved cognitive processing. Conclusions: Cognitive processing is a distinctive and critical human experience. Postoperative cognitive dysfunction is a common and potentially devastating complication. Study of potential therapeutic interventions in the postoperative period is essential to promote independence for the elderly patient and improve quality of life.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:57Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:57Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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