The Well-Being of Survivors of Childhood Cancer as Compared to Healthy Young Adults

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163298
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Well-Being of Survivors of Childhood Cancer as Compared to Healthy Young Adults
Author(s):
Cantrell, Mary Ann
Author Details:
Mary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mary.ann.cantrell@villanova.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this secondary analysis was to compare the well-being of childhood cancer survivors with healthy young adults. Theoretical Framework: The emerging population of childhood cancer survivors has generated a need for research to describe and understand both the physical and psychosocial functioning of these young adults. The existing findings from studies that have examined the psychosocial health status of childhood cancer survivors are mixed. A summary of existing research suggests that some childhood cancer survivors have managed to grow and develop in positive ways because of their cancer experience, most survivors are probably normal and would score normal on standardized tests of psychological functioning, and a small but significant proportion of childhood cancer survivors experience psychological and/or social adjustment difficulties (Zebrach & Zeltzer, 2003). To date there is no published study that has compared the psychosocial health status of early survivors of childhood cancer and their young adult healthy peers using a national representative sample; therefore, the presentation of this study's findings will offer the first examination of this phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A secondary analysis of data collected among 4879 older adolescents in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative, probability-based sample was conducted. Survey participants responded to 26 individual questions that addressed components of well-being. Each question was examined and placed into a cluster. Clusters were labeled based on existing measurements used in healthcare research. The clusters reflect the constructs of affect, self-esteem, and future orientation. Results: A preliminary analysis between the childhood cancer survivors (n = 39) and healthy controls (n = 4840) showed childhood cancer survivors to have a more negative affect and less self-esteem. Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study add to the understanding of the psychosocial health status of childhood cancer survivors, which may assist in the development of targeted interventions to improve their psychosocial functioning.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Well-Being of Survivors of Childhood Cancer as Compared to Healthy Young Adultsen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCantrell, Mary Annen_US
dc.author.detailsMary Ann Cantrell, PhD, RN, Villanova University, Villanova, Pennsylvania, USA, email: mary.ann.cantrell@villanova.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163298-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this secondary analysis was to compare the well-being of childhood cancer survivors with healthy young adults. Theoretical Framework: The emerging population of childhood cancer survivors has generated a need for research to describe and understand both the physical and psychosocial functioning of these young adults. The existing findings from studies that have examined the psychosocial health status of childhood cancer survivors are mixed. A summary of existing research suggests that some childhood cancer survivors have managed to grow and develop in positive ways because of their cancer experience, most survivors are probably normal and would score normal on standardized tests of psychological functioning, and a small but significant proportion of childhood cancer survivors experience psychological and/or social adjustment difficulties (Zebrach & Zeltzer, 2003). To date there is no published study that has compared the psychosocial health status of early survivors of childhood cancer and their young adult healthy peers using a national representative sample; therefore, the presentation of this study's findings will offer the first examination of this phenomenon. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): A secondary analysis of data collected among 4879 older adolescents in the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a nationally representative, probability-based sample was conducted. Survey participants responded to 26 individual questions that addressed components of well-being. Each question was examined and placed into a cluster. Clusters were labeled based on existing measurements used in healthcare research. The clusters reflect the constructs of affect, self-esteem, and future orientation. Results: A preliminary analysis between the childhood cancer survivors (n = 39) and healthy controls (n = 4840) showed childhood cancer survivors to have a more negative affect and less self-esteem. Conclusions and Implications: The findings of this study add to the understanding of the psychosocial health status of childhood cancer survivors, which may assist in the development of targeted interventions to improve their psychosocial functioning.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:04:58Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:04:58Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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