The Benefits and Limitations of Jourard's Theory in Identifying Illness-Related Self-Disclosure and Its Association to Self Management in Young Adults with Type 2 Diabetes

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163301
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Benefits and Limitations of Jourard's Theory in Identifying Illness-Related Self-Disclosure and Its Association to Self Management in Young Adults with Type 2 Diabetes
Author(s):
Chalykoff, Geraldine M.
Author Details:
Geraldine M. Chalykoff, MSN, PhD, University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: gerrych@rcn.com
Abstract:
Purpose: Every day young adults with type 2 diabetes are expected to practice healthy self-management behaviors and make appropriate lifestyle choices within a variety of social situations from one's family to public venues. However, little is known about the extent and nature of illness-related self-disclosure within social situations and how these are associated with efforts at self-management. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the usefulness of Jourard's (1971) theory of self-disclosure in identifying instances of illness-related self-disclosure and its role in self-managing diabetes. Background: Jourard's (1971) theory of self-disclosure was used to help address the following research questions: 1) To what extent do young adults with type 2 diabetes identify instances of illness-related self-disclosure during the course of their disease? 2) What is the nature of these instances? and 3) To what extent and how are these instances associated with efforts at self-management of diabetes? Approach: Examples from individual illness timelines, constructed from a series of in-depth, face-to-face interviews with five young adults with type 2 diabetes, will guide the presentation. Major Points & Rationale: Elements of Jourard's theory that were most helpful in identifying illness-related self-disclosure and its relationship to self-management behaviors included the concepts of self-disclosure, inspiriting feedback and dispiriting feedback, and the arguments for the role of self-disclosure in developing a sense of being (being "diabetic") and the effects of inspiriting and dispiriting responses on behavior (self-management behaviors). Conclusions: Jourard's theory was helpful in illuminating actual instances of illness related self-disclosure and the impact of these in managing diabetes. However, it did not help in delineating the thinking processes involved in self-disclosure or in recognizing the effects of the quality of existing of social relationships. Combining Dindia's Intra/Interpersonal Process Theory of Self-Disclosure (1994) with Jourard's work provides a promising guide for future research.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Benefits and Limitations of Jourard's Theory in Identifying Illness-Related Self-Disclosure and Its Association to Self Management in Young Adults with Type 2 Diabetesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChalykoff, Geraldine M.en_US
dc.author.detailsGeraldine M. Chalykoff, MSN, PhD, University of Rhode Island College of Nursing, Kingston, Rhode Island, USA, email: gerrych@rcn.comen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163301-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Every day young adults with type 2 diabetes are expected to practice healthy self-management behaviors and make appropriate lifestyle choices within a variety of social situations from one's family to public venues. However, little is known about the extent and nature of illness-related self-disclosure within social situations and how these are associated with efforts at self-management. The purpose of this presentation is to examine the usefulness of Jourard's (1971) theory of self-disclosure in identifying instances of illness-related self-disclosure and its role in self-managing diabetes. Background: Jourard's (1971) theory of self-disclosure was used to help address the following research questions: 1) To what extent do young adults with type 2 diabetes identify instances of illness-related self-disclosure during the course of their disease? 2) What is the nature of these instances? and 3) To what extent and how are these instances associated with efforts at self-management of diabetes? Approach: Examples from individual illness timelines, constructed from a series of in-depth, face-to-face interviews with five young adults with type 2 diabetes, will guide the presentation. Major Points & Rationale: Elements of Jourard's theory that were most helpful in identifying illness-related self-disclosure and its relationship to self-management behaviors included the concepts of self-disclosure, inspiriting feedback and dispiriting feedback, and the arguments for the role of self-disclosure in developing a sense of being (being "diabetic") and the effects of inspiriting and dispiriting responses on behavior (self-management behaviors). Conclusions: Jourard's theory was helpful in illuminating actual instances of illness related self-disclosure and the impact of these in managing diabetes. However, it did not help in delineating the thinking processes involved in self-disclosure or in recognizing the effects of the quality of existing of social relationships. Combining Dindia's Intra/Interpersonal Process Theory of Self-Disclosure (1994) with Jourard's work provides a promising guide for future research.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:02Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:02Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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