2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163303
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
The Effects of Nurses' Workload on Patient Falls in a Rehabilitation Hospital
Author(s):
Choi, Jeeyae; Schuster, Lois; Larocca, Ann Marie; Frost, Debra A.
Author Details:
Jeeyae Choi, RN, MS, DNSc, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: jchoi8@partners.org; Lois Schuster, RN, MA, CRRN; Ann Marie Larocca, RN, MS, CRRN; Debra A. Frost RN, MS, CRRN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of nurses' workload on falls and characteristics of falls in our rehabilitation setting. Background: Nurse staffing is an important issue for nurses' working conditions, quality nursing care and patient outcomes. Based on an AHRQ-funded Evidence-based Practice Center's Report in 2004, lower nurse staffing levels and higher rates of falls are associated. Therefore, it is worthy to investigate the association between direct nursing care hours and fall rates especially in a rehabilitation hospital setting. Methods (sources, analytic approach): A descriptive study design was used to investigate the association between nurses' workload and patient falls in our rehabilitation hospital. Patient data related to fall incidents and demographics for June and July of 2006 were collected from our electronic documentation system and fall safety occurrence reports. Clinical hours per workload index (HPWI) were collected from the patient acuity system, QuadraMed Win PFS 5.3. Results: A moderate relationship between HPWI and fall rate was found (correlation coefficient = 0.55). The total sample size was 40 (male fallers =29 (72.5%); female fallers = 11 (27.5%)). The age range was between 27 and 86 with the average age of 64 years. The Stroke/Neurology program showed the highest fall rate (13.2) and the Musculoskeletal/Vascular program showed the lowest fall rate (1.15). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study indicate that the nurses' workload positively influenced the fall rate in our rehabilitation hospital setting. Fall rates in our study, an adverse nurse-sensitive outcome, increased when the nurse's workload index increased. Findings of this study confirm that nurse staffing is related to fall incidents of patients in a rehabilitation hospital setting. This information will empower nurse executives and policy leaders in a rehabilitation hospital with evidence-based knowledge for better decision-making on nurse staffing that will eventually improve quality patient outcomes.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleThe Effects of Nurses' Workload on Patient Falls in a Rehabilitation Hospitalen_GB
dc.contributor.authorChoi, Jeeyaeen_US
dc.contributor.authorSchuster, Loisen_US
dc.contributor.authorLarocca, Ann Marieen_US
dc.contributor.authorFrost, Debra A.en_US
dc.author.detailsJeeyae Choi, RN, MS, DNSc, Spaulding Rehabilitation Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: jchoi8@partners.org; Lois Schuster, RN, MA, CRRN; Ann Marie Larocca, RN, MS, CRRN; Debra A. Frost RN, MS, CRRNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163303-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of nurses' workload on falls and characteristics of falls in our rehabilitation setting. Background: Nurse staffing is an important issue for nurses' working conditions, quality nursing care and patient outcomes. Based on an AHRQ-funded Evidence-based Practice Center's Report in 2004, lower nurse staffing levels and higher rates of falls are associated. Therefore, it is worthy to investigate the association between direct nursing care hours and fall rates especially in a rehabilitation hospital setting. Methods (sources, analytic approach): A descriptive study design was used to investigate the association between nurses' workload and patient falls in our rehabilitation hospital. Patient data related to fall incidents and demographics for June and July of 2006 were collected from our electronic documentation system and fall safety occurrence reports. Clinical hours per workload index (HPWI) were collected from the patient acuity system, QuadraMed Win PFS 5.3. Results: A moderate relationship between HPWI and fall rate was found (correlation coefficient = 0.55). The total sample size was 40 (male fallers =29 (72.5%); female fallers = 11 (27.5%)). The age range was between 27 and 86 with the average age of 64 years. The Stroke/Neurology program showed the highest fall rate (13.2) and the Musculoskeletal/Vascular program showed the lowest fall rate (1.15). Conclusions and Implications: The results of this study indicate that the nurses' workload positively influenced the fall rate in our rehabilitation hospital setting. Fall rates in our study, an adverse nurse-sensitive outcome, increased when the nurse's workload index increased. Findings of this study confirm that nurse staffing is related to fall incidents of patients in a rehabilitation hospital setting. This information will empower nurse executives and policy leaders in a rehabilitation hospital with evidence-based knowledge for better decision-making on nurse staffing that will eventually improve quality patient outcomes.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:04Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:04Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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