2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163304
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Development of CNI-ICU instrument for nurse workload assessment
Author(s):
Chou, ShinShang; Stone, Patricia W.
Author Details:
ShinShang Chou, RN, MSN, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: sc2578@columbia.edu; Patricia W. Stone PhD, MPH, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The overall goal of this study was to develop a Chinese version Nursing Interventions in Intensive Care Unit (CNI-ICU) instrument to measure nurse workload in a variety of adult critical care settings. Specifically, the aims were: 1) translate and modify an existing tool; 2) assess inter-rater reliability; 3) pilot test the tool for feasibility to measure patient's nursing needs; and 4) compare the CNI-ICU to existing measures of severity of illness and nurses' perceptions of workload. Theoretical Framework: Based on systems theory that incorporates patient centered care, nursing workload was conceptualized as including intensity of patients' physical and psychological needs, as well as families' needs. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Starting with the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-76 items (TISS-76), translation and modifications were conducted using three rounds of Delphi survey with an expert panel and 42 critical care nurses. The instrument was piloted in six units over a two week period using 20 data collectors. Inter-rater reliability was measured. The CNI-ICU scores were compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation version II (APACHE II) scores and nurses' perceptions of workload. Chi-square analyses, one way analysis of variances, and Pearson correlations were used in data analyses. Results: The final CNI-ICU instrument consists of 86 interventions organized into 12 clinical categories. Data were collected from 343 patients for a total of 2,114 CNI-ICU scores. Inter-rater agreement was 90%. Variations of CNI-ICU scores were significantly different among ICUs (p< .01). The CNI-ICU scores were positively correlated with APACHE II and the nurses' perceptions of workload (p values < .01). Conclusions and Implications: The CNI-ICU is a reliable and valid tool that measures both the patients' and families' nursing needs. This tool can allow nurse managers, for any given critical care setting, to use quantitative standards that reflect patients' and families' nursing needs to determine the required staffing levels.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleDevelopment of CNI-ICU instrument for nurse workload assessmenten_GB
dc.contributor.authorChou, ShinShangen_US
dc.contributor.authorStone, Patricia W.en_US
dc.author.detailsShinShang Chou, RN, MSN, Columbia University, New York, New York, USA, email: sc2578@columbia.edu; Patricia W. Stone PhD, MPH, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163304-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The overall goal of this study was to develop a Chinese version Nursing Interventions in Intensive Care Unit (CNI-ICU) instrument to measure nurse workload in a variety of adult critical care settings. Specifically, the aims were: 1) translate and modify an existing tool; 2) assess inter-rater reliability; 3) pilot test the tool for feasibility to measure patient's nursing needs; and 4) compare the CNI-ICU to existing measures of severity of illness and nurses' perceptions of workload. Theoretical Framework: Based on systems theory that incorporates patient centered care, nursing workload was conceptualized as including intensity of patients' physical and psychological needs, as well as families' needs. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): Starting with the Therapeutic Intervention Scoring System-76 items (TISS-76), translation and modifications were conducted using three rounds of Delphi survey with an expert panel and 42 critical care nurses. The instrument was piloted in six units over a two week period using 20 data collectors. Inter-rater reliability was measured. The CNI-ICU scores were compared to Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation version II (APACHE II) scores and nurses' perceptions of workload. Chi-square analyses, one way analysis of variances, and Pearson correlations were used in data analyses. Results: The final CNI-ICU instrument consists of 86 interventions organized into 12 clinical categories. Data were collected from 343 patients for a total of 2,114 CNI-ICU scores. Inter-rater agreement was 90%. Variations of CNI-ICU scores were significantly different among ICUs (p< .01). The CNI-ICU scores were positively correlated with APACHE II and the nurses' perceptions of workload (p values < .01). Conclusions and Implications: The CNI-ICU is a reliable and valid tool that measures both the patients' and families' nursing needs. This tool can allow nurse managers, for any given critical care setting, to use quantitative standards that reflect patients' and families' nursing needs to determine the required staffing levels.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:05Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:05Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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