Building Bridges between Academia and Acute Care: Using Clinical Pathways as a Teaching Tool in Medical Surgical Nursing

23.00
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163305
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Building Bridges between Academia and Acute Care: Using Clinical Pathways as a Teaching Tool in Medical Surgical Nursing
Author(s):
Cohn, Elizabeth; Coonan, Patrick; Greenfield, Sue; Whelan, Barbara; Eckardt, Patricia
Author Details:
Elizabeth Cohn, RN, DNSc, Adelphi University, New York, New York, USA, email: cohn@adelphi.edu; Patrick Coonan, EdD, MED, MPA; Sue Greenfield, PhD, CRNA; Barbara Whelan, MS, RN; Patricia Eckardt, MBA, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: Faculty in nursing programs are continually seeking innovative teaching methods to improve students' performance both in the classroom as well as in the clinical setting. The gap between didactic teaching and actual clinical performance has been well documented. Clinical pathways have been used as a bridge from the academic acquisition of knowledge of disease management to an understanding of day-to-day management of patients in a hospital setting. The effect of teaching utilizing clinical pathways on classroom performance is a first step in demonstrating its effectiveness in an undergraduate nursing program. The purpose of this study was to compare two types of classroom teaching methods in a Medical Surgical Undergraduate Course: Traditional Teaching (TT) and teaching using clinical pathways (TCP). Theoretical Framework: Benner's Expert to Novice Model and Dreyfus' Model of Skill Acquisition guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The effect of the teaching method was measured using the standardized Educational Resources Inc. (ERI) and the students' end of Course Grade. Results: Data analysis showed that the groups were not significantly different on the two measures: ERI p= 0.10 and Course Grade P= 0.17. However, further analysis revealed that the GPA scores for Group 1 (N-76) were significantly higher than Group 2 (n-126) at the outset (p= < 0.05). The finding of no significance between groups may be interpreted, with caution, as TCP's effect to raise Group 2's GPAs, almost equalizing them with Group 1's at the end of the course. The limitations of the study are discussed. Conclusions and Implications: Further comparative studies are recommended on TCP as a teaching method using groups matched on beginning GPA. Incorporating other relevant academic profile measures (overall GPA on science courses, ESL, etc.) may also help to predict TCPs effect on specific student groups. In addition, the use of TCP's effect on students' clinical performance is an important future study to undertake.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleBuilding Bridges between Academia and Acute Care: Using Clinical Pathways as a Teaching Tool in Medical Surgical Nursingen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCohn, Elizabethen_US
dc.contributor.authorCoonan, Patricken_US
dc.contributor.authorGreenfield, Sueen_US
dc.contributor.authorWhelan, Barbaraen_US
dc.contributor.authorEckardt, Patriciaen_US
dc.author.detailsElizabeth Cohn, RN, DNSc, Adelphi University, New York, New York, USA, email: cohn@adelphi.edu; Patrick Coonan, EdD, MED, MPA; Sue Greenfield, PhD, CRNA; Barbara Whelan, MS, RN; Patricia Eckardt, MBA, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163305-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: Faculty in nursing programs are continually seeking innovative teaching methods to improve students' performance both in the classroom as well as in the clinical setting. The gap between didactic teaching and actual clinical performance has been well documented. Clinical pathways have been used as a bridge from the academic acquisition of knowledge of disease management to an understanding of day-to-day management of patients in a hospital setting. The effect of teaching utilizing clinical pathways on classroom performance is a first step in demonstrating its effectiveness in an undergraduate nursing program. The purpose of this study was to compare two types of classroom teaching methods in a Medical Surgical Undergraduate Course: Traditional Teaching (TT) and teaching using clinical pathways (TCP). Theoretical Framework: Benner's Expert to Novice Model and Dreyfus' Model of Skill Acquisition guided the study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): The effect of the teaching method was measured using the standardized Educational Resources Inc. (ERI) and the students' end of Course Grade. Results: Data analysis showed that the groups were not significantly different on the two measures: ERI p= 0.10 and Course Grade P= 0.17. However, further analysis revealed that the GPA scores for Group 1 (N-76) were significantly higher than Group 2 (n-126) at the outset (p= < 0.05). The finding of no significance between groups may be interpreted, with caution, as TCP's effect to raise Group 2's GPAs, almost equalizing them with Group 1's at the end of the course. The limitations of the study are discussed. Conclusions and Implications: Further comparative studies are recommended on TCP as a teaching method using groups matched on beginning GPA. Incorporating other relevant academic profile measures (overall GPA on science courses, ESL, etc.) may also help to predict TCPs effect on specific student groups. In addition, the use of TCP's effect on students' clinical performance is an important future study to undertake.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:07Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:07Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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