2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163307
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Age-related differences in smoking relapse among women
Author(s):
Cooley, Mary E.; Powell, Mark; Hoskinson, Randall A.; Garvey, Arthur J.
Author Details:
Mary E. Cooley, PhD, RN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_cooley@dfci.harvard.edu; Mark Powell, MA; Randall A. Hoskinson, MA, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Arthur J. Garvey, PhD, Harvard School of Dental Medicine
Abstract:
Purpose: This study examines whether pre-cessation and post-quit-day-1 (D1) factors associated with smoking relapse (SR) differed among younger (< 40) and older (> 40) women, and examines differences in self-reported reasons for SR. Theoretical Framework: The biobehavioral model of nicotine addiction was used to guide this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study was a secondary analysis. Data were collected from a community-based sample of 312 women using standardized reliable and valid questionnaires. Salivary cotinine was used to confirm smoking abstinence. Chi-square and multivariate time-to-event analyses were performed. Results: Pre-cessation factors significantly associated with time-to-relapse (TTR) were increased depression among younger women and lower motivation and NRT dose among older women. There was a significant age interaction with depression, and motivation but not dose suggesting that depression and motivation affect TTR differently in younger versus older women. D1 factors associated with TTR were increased craving and lower self-efficacy in negative affect situations among younger women and lower motivation among older women. There was a significant age interaction with craving, self-efficacy in negative affect situations, and motivation indicating that TTR differs among younger and older women. Twenty-one percent of younger women as compared to 10% of older women identified use of alcohol as the reason for early SR. Another 13% of younger women as compared to 24% of older women identified craving tobacco as the reason for early SR. Conclusions and Implications: Results from this study suggest that factors associated with SR differ by age. It appears that behavioral treatments targeting negative affect may be beneficial among younger women, whereas behavioral treatments that increase motivation to quit smoking are needed among older women.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleAge-related differences in smoking relapse among womenen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCooley, Mary E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorPowell, Marken_US
dc.contributor.authorHoskinson, Randall A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorGarvey, Arthur J.en_US
dc.author.detailsMary E. Cooley, PhD, RN, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, Massachusetts, USA, email: mary_cooley@dfci.harvard.edu; Mark Powell, MA; Randall A. Hoskinson, MA, Harvard School of Dental Medicine; Arthur J. Garvey, PhD, Harvard School of Dental Medicineen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163307-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study examines whether pre-cessation and post-quit-day-1 (D1) factors associated with smoking relapse (SR) differed among younger (< 40) and older (> 40) women, and examines differences in self-reported reasons for SR. Theoretical Framework: The biobehavioral model of nicotine addiction was used to guide this study. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study was a secondary analysis. Data were collected from a community-based sample of 312 women using standardized reliable and valid questionnaires. Salivary cotinine was used to confirm smoking abstinence. Chi-square and multivariate time-to-event analyses were performed. Results: Pre-cessation factors significantly associated with time-to-relapse (TTR) were increased depression among younger women and lower motivation and NRT dose among older women. There was a significant age interaction with depression, and motivation but not dose suggesting that depression and motivation affect TTR differently in younger versus older women. D1 factors associated with TTR were increased craving and lower self-efficacy in negative affect situations among younger women and lower motivation among older women. There was a significant age interaction with craving, self-efficacy in negative affect situations, and motivation indicating that TTR differs among younger and older women. Twenty-one percent of younger women as compared to 10% of older women identified use of alcohol as the reason for early SR. Another 13% of younger women as compared to 24% of older women identified craving tobacco as the reason for early SR. Conclusions and Implications: Results from this study suggest that factors associated with SR differ by age. It appears that behavioral treatments targeting negative affect may be beneficial among younger women, whereas behavioral treatments that increase motivation to quit smoking are needed among older women.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:09Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:09Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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