2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163308
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Watching and Worrying: Early Pregnancy after Loss Experiences
Author(s):
Cote-Arsenault, Denise
Author Details:
Denise Cote-Arsenault, PhD, RNC, FNAP, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Denise_Cote-Arsenault@urmc.rochester.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: To describe women's early pregnancy after loss (PAL) experiences, up to 25 weeks gestation, document the timing and frequency of their common discomforts and events, and explore changes over time. Background: Unlike earlier pregnancies, anxiety and worry about another loss, comparisons with past pregnancies, and holding back attachment to this pregnancy and baby comprise normal responses in PAL. Descriptions of women's PAL experiences reveal a "constellation of concerns and contrasting emotions" related to the pregnancy, self image, relationships, and loss. Pregnancy anxiety fluctuates in response to pregnancy symptoms and prenatal assessments. However, experiences, emotions, concerns, and coping methods across pregnancy have not been examined. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive, longitudinal design with multiple tri-angulation (data, methods, analyses) was used for this study. Thematic analysis was done from field notes and hand-written calendar entries; content analysis was conducted on sticker-entered events and symptoms. Results: Themes identified in the data were Growing Confident, Fluctuating Worry, Interpreting Signs, Managing Pregnancy, and Having Dreams. The first four themes comprise the see-saw nature of these pregnancies. Managing Pregnancy includes the sub-themes of Being Hyper Vigilant, Seeking Reassurance, and Relying on Internal Beliefs. The theme of Having Dreams was a serendipitous finding, in that women reported their dreams without prompting, but the data did not reach saturation. Calendar stickers indicate that fatigue and headaches are the most commonly reported discomforts. Fetal movement, felt by all the women by 25 weeks gestation, was very reassuring. Conclusions and Implications: Most noteworthy is the voluminous number of events reported by the women in this study, the omnipresent worry and anxiety they experienced, and the extent to which they sought reassurance that their pregnancy and baby were okay. Clinicians must understand that frequent calls and visits from women in a pregnancy after loss are the most common and comforting way of coping with their worry.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleWatching and Worrying: Early Pregnancy after Loss Experiencesen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCote-Arsenault, Deniseen_US
dc.author.detailsDenise Cote-Arsenault, PhD, RNC, FNAP, University of Rochester, Rochester, New York, USA, email: Denise_Cote-Arsenault@urmc.rochester.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163308-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To describe women's early pregnancy after loss (PAL) experiences, up to 25 weeks gestation, document the timing and frequency of their common discomforts and events, and explore changes over time. Background: Unlike earlier pregnancies, anxiety and worry about another loss, comparisons with past pregnancies, and holding back attachment to this pregnancy and baby comprise normal responses in PAL. Descriptions of women's PAL experiences reveal a "constellation of concerns and contrasting emotions" related to the pregnancy, self image, relationships, and loss. Pregnancy anxiety fluctuates in response to pregnancy symptoms and prenatal assessments. However, experiences, emotions, concerns, and coping methods across pregnancy have not been examined. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): A qualitative descriptive, longitudinal design with multiple tri-angulation (data, methods, analyses) was used for this study. Thematic analysis was done from field notes and hand-written calendar entries; content analysis was conducted on sticker-entered events and symptoms. Results: Themes identified in the data were Growing Confident, Fluctuating Worry, Interpreting Signs, Managing Pregnancy, and Having Dreams. The first four themes comprise the see-saw nature of these pregnancies. Managing Pregnancy includes the sub-themes of Being Hyper Vigilant, Seeking Reassurance, and Relying on Internal Beliefs. The theme of Having Dreams was a serendipitous finding, in that women reported their dreams without prompting, but the data did not reach saturation. Calendar stickers indicate that fatigue and headaches are the most commonly reported discomforts. Fetal movement, felt by all the women by 25 weeks gestation, was very reassuring. Conclusions and Implications: Most noteworthy is the voluminous number of events reported by the women in this study, the omnipresent worry and anxiety they experienced, and the extent to which they sought reassurance that their pregnancy and baby were okay. Clinicians must understand that frequent calls and visits from women in a pregnancy after loss are the most common and comforting way of coping with their worry.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:10Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:10Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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