Voices from the Battlefield: Reports of the Daily Experiences of Urban, Black Mothers

2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163309
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
Voices from the Battlefield: Reports of the Daily Experiences of Urban, Black Mothers
Author(s):
Cricco-Lizza, Roberta Rae
Author Details:
Roberta Rae Cricco-Lizza, RN, PhD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.edu
Abstract:
Purpose: This study explored low-income, urban, Black women's day-to-day life experiences during pregnancy, childbirth, and recovery. Background: Healthy People 2010 calls for elimination of health disparities. Black women continue to have the highest rates of morbidity during childbirth, the highest maternal death rate, and the highest infant mortality rate in the U.S. Understanding the social context of women's lives can lead to insight into the factors related to these rates and help to identify interventions to reduce these disparities. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An ethnographic approach was used over an 18-month period with interviewing and participant observation of general and key informants. The study took place in an urban WIC clinic and neighborhood in the New York metropolitan area. General informants consisted of 130 Black, non-Hispanic mothers enrolled in WIC. Within this group, purposeful sampling was used to find 11 primiparous women to serve as key informants. These key informants were followed closely from pregnancy to 1 year postpartum, with 11 to 32 encounters each. Audiotaped interviews and field notes were gathered for mothers' descriptions of their everyday lives. Data were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management, retrieval, and analysis. Results: The women described daily battles related to a lack of material and human resources. They reported struggles with finances, housing, education, employment, safety, loss, and racism. To deal with these challenges, they proactively assumed the role of soldiers, took short-lived breaks, trusted in God for justice, shared their resources with their comrades, used escape mechanisms, and developed new tactical maneuvers. Conclusions and Implications: The informant-derived soldier metaphor clearly described the women's daily struggles to meet basic human needs. Trusting relationships with professionals ameliorated some barriers, but to eliminate disparities in maternal child health, fundamental infrastructural interventions are needed.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleVoices from the Battlefield: Reports of the Daily Experiences of Urban, Black Mothersen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCricco-Lizza, Roberta Raeen_US
dc.author.detailsRoberta Rae Cricco-Lizza, RN, PhD, MPH, University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing, Towaco, New Jersey, USA, email: rcricco@nursing.upenn.eduen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163309-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: This study explored low-income, urban, Black women's day-to-day life experiences during pregnancy, childbirth, and recovery. Background: Healthy People 2010 calls for elimination of health disparities. Black women continue to have the highest rates of morbidity during childbirth, the highest maternal death rate, and the highest infant mortality rate in the U.S. Understanding the social context of women's lives can lead to insight into the factors related to these rates and help to identify interventions to reduce these disparities. Methods (Design, Participants, Setting, Data Collection, Analytic approach): An ethnographic approach was used over an 18-month period with interviewing and participant observation of general and key informants. The study took place in an urban WIC clinic and neighborhood in the New York metropolitan area. General informants consisted of 130 Black, non-Hispanic mothers enrolled in WIC. Within this group, purposeful sampling was used to find 11 primiparous women to serve as key informants. These key informants were followed closely from pregnancy to 1 year postpartum, with 11 to 32 encounters each. Audiotaped interviews and field notes were gathered for mothers' descriptions of their everyday lives. Data were coded and analyzed for recurring patterns and themes. NUD*IST aided data management, retrieval, and analysis. Results: The women described daily battles related to a lack of material and human resources. They reported struggles with finances, housing, education, employment, safety, loss, and racism. To deal with these challenges, they proactively assumed the role of soldiers, took short-lived breaks, trusted in God for justice, shared their resources with their comrades, used escape mechanisms, and developed new tactical maneuvers. Conclusions and Implications: The informant-derived soldier metaphor clearly described the women's daily struggles to meet basic human needs. Trusting relationships with professionals ameliorated some barriers, but to eliminate disparities in maternal child health, fundamental infrastructural interventions are needed.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:11Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:11Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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