2.50
Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10755/163311
Category:
Abstract
Type:
Presentation
Title:
National Assessment of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforce
Author(s):
Cusson, Regina M.; Buus-Frank, Madge E.; Flanagan, Victoria A.; Miller, Stephanie; Zukowsky, Ksenia; Rasmussen, Lynn
Author Details:
Regina M. Cusson, RNC, APRN, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: regina.cusson@uconn.edu; Madge E. Buus-Frank, RNC, MS, ARNP; Victoria A. Flanagan, RN, MS; Stephanie Miller, RN, MPH, Children's Hospital at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; Ksenia Zukowsky, CRNP, RNC, PhD, Jefferson College of Health Professionals; Lynn Rasmussen, RN
Abstract:
Purpose: The purpose of this pilot study was a description of issues affecting the NNP workforce, such as the NNP shortage & its impact on recruitment, salary & reimbursement issues, as well as a description of the current NNP workforce. Theoretical Framework: None. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study used an online survey developed for the research. Following IRB approval, a blanket email invitation was sent to all participants on the mailing list of the APN Forum 2006. Attendees were also invited to participate on-site. A total of 348 potential participants were identified and 75% (260) responded to the invitation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Results: The sample was comprised of female (95%) NNPs (88%) with masters degrees (80%), with an average age of 46 years, working primarily in level III NICUs (85%). Average salary was $86,700, with only 35% billing for services, and funding coming from medicine (43%), nursing (37%) or a combination of both (20%). NNPs identified the biggest rewards in the role as their contribution to the team (37%) and their autonomy (32%). Major challenges identified included overload of responsibilities (23%), the NNP shortage (21%), low pay (13%), and stressful work schedule (12%). Over 85% of participants indicated that the need for NNPs increased over the past five years and estimated that over 500 new NNPs would be needed in the near future. While the majority had not substituted other providers, 52% said they had funded but unfilled positions. Respondents said it took six months to two years to fill a vacant position, even with the use of advertisements, partnership with educational institutions, recruiters and incentive packages. Conclusions and Implications: Reducing the NNP shortage will require innovative strategies, including intensive efforts on the part of both educational and clinical agencies.
Repository Posting Date:
27-Oct-2011
Date of Publication:
27-Oct-2011
Conference Date:
2007
Conference Name:
19th Annual Scientific Sessions
Conference Host:
Eastern Nursing Research Society
Conference Location:
Providence, Rhode Island, USA
Description:
Conference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.
Note:
This is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.type.categoryAbstracten_US
dc.typePresentationen_GB
dc.titleNational Assessment of the Neonatal Nurse Practitioner Workforceen_GB
dc.contributor.authorCusson, Regina M.en_US
dc.contributor.authorBuus-Frank, Madge E.en_US
dc.contributor.authorFlanagan, Victoria A.en_US
dc.contributor.authorMiller, Stephanieen_US
dc.contributor.authorZukowsky, Kseniaen_US
dc.contributor.authorRasmussen, Lynnen_US
dc.author.detailsRegina M. Cusson, RNC, APRN, PhD, University of Connecticut School of Nursing, Storrs, Connecticut, USA, email: regina.cusson@uconn.edu; Madge E. Buus-Frank, RNC, MS, ARNP; Victoria A. Flanagan, RN, MS; Stephanie Miller, RN, MPH, Children's Hospital at the Dartmouth-Hitchcock Medical Center; Ksenia Zukowsky, CRNP, RNC, PhD, Jefferson College of Health Professionals; Lynn Rasmussen, RNen_US
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10755/163311-
dc.description.abstractPurpose: The purpose of this pilot study was a description of issues affecting the NNP workforce, such as the NNP shortage & its impact on recruitment, salary & reimbursement issues, as well as a description of the current NNP workforce. Theoretical Framework: None. Methods (Design, Sample, Setting, Measures, Analysis): This study used an online survey developed for the research. Following IRB approval, a blanket email invitation was sent to all participants on the mailing list of the APN Forum 2006. Attendees were also invited to participate on-site. A total of 348 potential participants were identified and 75% (260) responded to the invitation. Data were analyzed using descriptive and correlational statistics. Results: The sample was comprised of female (95%) NNPs (88%) with masters degrees (80%), with an average age of 46 years, working primarily in level III NICUs (85%). Average salary was $86,700, with only 35% billing for services, and funding coming from medicine (43%), nursing (37%) or a combination of both (20%). NNPs identified the biggest rewards in the role as their contribution to the team (37%) and their autonomy (32%). Major challenges identified included overload of responsibilities (23%), the NNP shortage (21%), low pay (13%), and stressful work schedule (12%). Over 85% of participants indicated that the need for NNPs increased over the past five years and estimated that over 500 new NNPs would be needed in the near future. While the majority had not substituted other providers, 52% said they had funded but unfilled positions. Respondents said it took six months to two years to fill a vacant position, even with the use of advertisements, partnership with educational institutions, recruiters and incentive packages. Conclusions and Implications: Reducing the NNP shortage will require innovative strategies, including intensive efforts on the part of both educational and clinical agencies.en_GB
dc.date.available2011-10-27T11:05:13Z-
dc.date.issued2011-10-27en_GB
dc.date.accessioned2011-10-27T11:05:13Z-
dc.conference.date2007en_US
dc.conference.name19th Annual Scientific Sessionsen_US
dc.conference.hostEastern Nursing Research Societyen_US
dc.conference.locationProvidence, Rhode Island, USAen_US
dc.descriptionConference theme: Building Communities of Scholarship and Research, held April 12-14, 2007 at The Westin Providence.en_US
dc.description.noteThis is an abstract-only submission. If the author has submitted a full-text item based on this abstract, you may find it by browsing the Virginia Henderson Global Nursing e-Repository by author. If author contact information is available in this abstract, please feel free to contact him or her with your queries regarding this submission. Alternatively, please contact the conference host, journal, or publisher (according to the circumstance) for further details regarding this item. If a citation is listed in this record, the item has been published and is available via open-access avenues or a journal/database subscription. Contact your library for assistance in obtaining the as-published article.-
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